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General

  • Can I get off of my opioids / narcotics by using marijuana?

    The goal of medical marijuana is to help you find alternative ways to treat your medical issues. Ideally, patients will be able to start weaning off of their narcotics, sleeping pills, and antidepressants. Let us help guide you through this, at times slow, but effective process. Many of our patients remain on some of their original medications, but far less than before medical marijuana.

  • How do I get started?

    Schedule a consultation with us. You can also give us a call at 801-851-5554.

  • How dangerous is medical marijuana?

    Nobody has ever died of a medical marijuana overdose and it is one of the safest substances to use. However, mixing marijuana and other drugs or alcohol is not advised. Check with us or your regular doctor about possible drug-drug interactions with other medications you are taking.

  • What are the common side effects of medical marijuana?

    Some patients find that they feel impaired or “high” and do not like it. Some patients with high CBD doses feel so relaxed that they get sleepy. Those with high THC doses may feel anxious. Dry mouth and red eyes are not uncommon. We are happy to walk through side effects with you to determine if medical marijuana is right for you.

  • What forms of medical marijuana are Utah patients legally allowed to use?

    Medical marijuana will only be available in the following forms under the Utah Medical Cannabis Act:

    • A tablet or capsule
    • Concentrated oil like cartridges for vaping
    • A liquid suspension
    • Topical or transdermal lotion or cream
    • Sublingual preparation or tincture
    • A gelatinous cube (gummy)
    • Unprocessed cannabis flower
    • Wax or resin ONLY IF a patient has failed on 2 other forms. This must be listed in your medical record.*
      *If a patient fails to substantially respond on two other forms listed, a qualified medical provider may recommend wax or resin.

    Smoking of marijuana is not permitted but patients may purchase a medical marijuana device that warms marijuana material into a vapor without the use of a flame and delivers marijuana to an individual’s respiratory system (such as an electric dabbing rig). Although smoking of medical marijuana is prohibited, vaping is legal. The law prohibits candies, cookies, brownies, and other edible products. Unprocessed flowers outside of blister packs are not permitted.

  • What are the most common qualifying conditions for a medical marijuana card in Utah?

    More than 90% of people will say pain is their primary complaint when seeking relief with medical marijuana. That is where most of the evidence supporting the use of the marijuana plant exists and where most people find it beneficial. Utah defines pain as pain lasting longer than two weeks and is not controlled with a typical medication like Tylenol, ibuprofen, Aspirin or physical therapy.

    The next most common complaint for people to use medical marijuana is nausea. Persistent nausea is a qualifying condition in Utah. Most commonly, cancer patients will be prescribed medical marijuana for persistent nausea after chemotherapy

    Nausea that’s related to pregnancy is not a condition we recommend medical marijuana for. There is currently not enough information about the side effects of marijuana and the safety of the baby. We do know that pain and nausea are conditions that are maltreated with marijuana.

  • How do I find a provider that will recommend medical marijuana?

    The first thing you should do is call your existing primary care provider or existing pain specialist. These are the people you have a relationship with and know you the best. If those providers are unwilling, they don’t know enough about it, or they feel uncomfortable, the next step is to try to find somebody trustworthy for this recommendation.

    Finding a provider in Utah might be difficult because there are very few providers out there who are willing to recommend medical marijuana as a treatment option. A provider should have in-depth knowledge about the safety, benefits, delivery methods, and dosing to feel comfortable helping you with your particular condition.

    Our team is willing and able to help you if it proves to be a good fit. In addition, our website has information about finding a knowledgeable provider. The Utah Patient Coalition is also a trustworthy place for asking for help.

    Finally, there will be a state database and list of providers that are qualified at the Utah Department of Health website in the spring of 2020. For more information reach out and email us with questions or comments.

    Contact Us

  • What does a typical patient visit look like?

    A typical patient visit for a medical marijuana consultation and recommendation starts by making an appointment. Make sure you are meeting with a provider that is willing and knowledgeable about medical marijuana, carries the appropriate malpractice insurance, and is a qualified medical provider in Utah.

    You will then need to know if the clinic accepts your insurance or if they require you to pay for the visit out of pocket. Most pain clinics, primary care providers, and medical marijuana specialists are going to require you to pay out-of-pocket between $250 and $300 for the initial consultation. This clinic visit allows the practitioner to establish a relationship and to write you the recommendation.

    There will be an intake form and many providers will require you to bring in documentation that proves your diagnosis.

    Don’t have a provider? Schedule a consultation with us. You can also give us a call at 801-851-5554.

  • How do I qualify for medical marijuana?

    There are 15 Qualifying Conditions in the current Utah law that will allow you to keep and use medical marijuana:

    • Pain lasting longer than two weeks that is not adequately managed despite treatment attempts
    • ALS (Lou Gehrig’s disease)
    • Alzheimer’s disease
    • Autism
    • Cachexia
    • Cancer
    • Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis
    • HIV/AIDS
    • Epilepsy or a similar condition that causes “debilitating seizures”
    • Multiple sclerosis or persistent and debilitating muscle spasms
    • Nausea that is persistent and not responsive to traditional treatment (except for pregnancy)
    • PTSD “that is being treated or monitored by a licensed mental health provider”
    • Any terminal illness where life expectancy is less than six months
    • Any condition resulting in hospice care
    • Any rare condition that affects fewer than 200,000 persons in the United States as defined by Section 526 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and is not adequately managed despite treatment attempts
  • What if my medical condition is not listed, such as anxiety, depression, or migraine headaches?

    Many people use CBD-dominant marijuana strains that include a small amount of THC to help manage their anxiety and depression, but these medical conditions are not currently included in the current law in Utah as qualifying conditions. In these cases, you and your medical provider can petition the Compassionate Use Board for a medical marijuana card.

  • What forms of medical marijuana can I use?

    Medical marijuana will only be available in the following forms under the Utah Medical Marijuana Act:

    • A tablet or capsule
    • Concentrated oil like cartridges for vaping
    • A liquid suspension
    • Topical or transdermal lotion or cream
    • Sublingual preparation or tincture
    • A gelatinous cube (gummy)
    • Unprocessed marijuana flower
    • Wax or resin ONLY IF a patient has failed on 2 other forms. This must be listed in your medical record.*

    *If a patient fails to substantially respond on two other forms listed, a qualified medical provider may recommend wax or resin.

    Smoking of marijuana is not permitted but patients may purchase a medical marijuana device that warms marijuana material into a vapor without the use of a flame and delivers marijuana to an individual’s respiratory system (such as an electric dabbing rig).

    The law prohibits candies, cookies, brownies, and other edible products. Unprocessed flowers outside of blister packs are not permitted.

  • How much marijuana can I buy at the dispensary?

    Based on the dosing recommendations of your medical provider you can buy up to a 30 day supply. For example, if your maximum daily dose is 40 mg you can purchase up to 1200 mg of THC at the dispensary every 30 days.

    You cannot buy more than 4 ounces of raw flour or more than 20 g of THC.

  • Where can I go for updates about the Utah medical marijuana program?

    Our website is a great place to find information and education about the Utah medical marijuana program. Medicalmarijuana.utah.gov is also a good resource, run by the Department of Health.

  • Who can recommend medical marijuana to a patient?

    Before January 2021, any Utah-licensed Advanced Practice Registered Nurse (APRN), Doctor of Medicine (MD), Doctor of Osteopathy (DO), or Physician Assistant (PA) who holds a controlled substance license can recommend medical marijuana treatment to a patient with a qualifying condition. After March 1, 2020, these providers need to have completed four hours of continuing medical education approved by the Department of Health and pay a $300 fee to be allowed to recommend medical marijuana.

  • Where can I find a medical provider willing to recommend medical marijuana?

    I have been contacted by a lot of patients who cannot find a qualified medical provider who is willing to write them a recommendation for medical marijuana. Of course, I always recommend myself, but a good place to look is the Society of Marijuana Clinicians ‘Provider Directory’. This ensures that you’re getting somebody who is well qualified.

  • Does insurance cover medical marijuana?

    No. Federal law labels marijuana as a Schedule One Drug so it is federally illegal. However, it is legal in Utah for medical uses when recommended by a qualified medical provider. Insurance companies follow federal guidelines so they will not pay for either the clinic visit or the marijuana itself. You can usually pay for your consultation with any major credit card but you must buy your medical marijuana at the dispensary with cash.

  • Where can I buy medical marijuana in Utah?

    Currently, there are no dispensaries open in Utah, but there are 14 licensed businesses that are working on opening dispensaries throughout the state. Eight of these dispensaries will be up and running in the next few months, mostly in Salt Lake, Ogden, and Provo areas. We will announce on our website when those dispensaries are open.

  • Can I buy CBD without a medical marijuana card?

    Yes. CBD is legal for anyone to purchase and possess as long as it contains less than 0.3% THC. These plans are considered hemp because they have almost no THC in them. Marijuana or marijuana plants are plants that contain more than 0.3% THC and those products require you to have a medical marijuana card in order to buy them in Utah dispensaries.

  • How am I protected as a medical provider?

    As long as the medical provider is a licensed PA, NP or physician and meets the requirements of the state to be a qualified medical provider to recommend medical marijuana they are not subject to civil or criminal liability or sanctions under the medical practice acts that would otherwise prohibit them from recommending, prescribing, or dispensing medical marijuana a medical marijuana product or marijuana-based drug that the US FDA has not approved.

    That being said medical providers should have specific malpractice insurance that covers the recommendation of medical marijuana to their patients and if that provider is a PA they must have specific language in the delegation of services agreement that says they are allowed to recommend medical marijuana.

  • As a provider where can I find education a medical cannabis?

    There are many resources for providers defined education such as the Society of cannabis clinicians the American medical marijuana physicians Association healer.com and even here@utahmarijuana.org.

    The Utah Department of Health also has resources for continuing education that include the four-hour requirement to become a qualified medical provider in Utah at the Department of Health’s website for medical cannabis.

  • What happens after January 1 of 2021?

    After 2020 patients must have an official medical marijuana card issued from the state of Utah in order to use and possess medical marijuana.

  • What are the qualifying conditions for obtaining a Utah medical marijuana card?

    There are 15 Qualifying Conditions ( 26-61a-104) in the current Utah law that will allow you to keep and use medical marijuana:

    • Pain lasting longer than two weeks that is not adequately managed despite treatment attempts
    • ALS (Lou Gehrig’s disease)
    • Alzheimer’s disease
    • Autism
    • Cachexia
    • Cancer
    • Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis
    • HIV/AIDS
    • Epilepsy or a similar condition that causes “debilitating seizures”
    • Multiple sclerosis or persistent and debilitating muscle spasms
    • Nausea (must be persistent)
    • PTSD “that is being treated or monitored by a licensed mental health provider”
    • Any terminal illness where life expectancy is less than six months
    • Any condition resulting in hospice care
    • Any rare condition that affects fewer than 200,000 persons in the United States as defined by Section 526 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and is not adequately managed despite treatment attempts.
  • I have PTSD. Can I get a medical card?

    PTSD can be tricky. It is the only mental health condition that is a qualifying condition but must be treated and monitored by qualified individual providers in order to be eligible.

    You are qualified for a medical marijuana card if any VA healthcare provider has diagnosed you with PTSD.

    Note, if you were diagnosed with PTSD by a licensed clinical social worker who does not have a Ph.D., you would not qualify and would need to find a different practitioner to establish that particular diagnosis.

  • What’s the difference between a letter and an actual Utah marijuana card?

    If you have a letter of recommendation from a medical provider for the use of medical marijuana, you are good to keep and use medical marijuana until January 1 of 2021.

    You can’t have more than the law allows and you must have it in a form that’s allowed by the current law.

    This might not protect you from violations of federal law or the laws of other states. I recommend visiting Canon Law Group in downtown Salt Lake City who are experts in medical marijuana law to find out more about your specific legal concerns.

  • How much does it cost to get a medical marijuana card?

    The initial clinic visit for a medical marijuana card is likely going to cost between $250 and $300. This is because it is not covered by insurance as it is federally illegal.

    The card itself will likely cost about $15 and is paid to the state of Utah.

    Because cards will be good for six months you will need to plan on paying for a follow-up visit every six months to renew your card with your medical provider.

  • Are there different types of medical marijuana cards?

    There are four different types of medical marijuana cards in Utah. Adults 21 years of age and older will get patient cards.

    Patients between the ages of 18 to 21 also get a patient card but need a provable from the Compassionate Use Board before it is issued.

    Anybody under the age of 18 who uses medical marijuana will receive a provisional patient card. These are issued along with a Guardian Card for the parent or guardian of that patient.

    The last type of card is Caregiver Cards which are given to adults 21 years or older who are caring for someone that’s unable to use or buy marijuana on their own.

  • How long is my marijuana card good for?

    Medical marijuana cards in Utah are good for six months and need to be reviewed and renewed every six months. The first time they are issued however they need to be renewed in 30 days. A follow-up visit is required with your medical provider at the 30-day mark in order to make that renewal.

Legal

  • Will I lose my job if I test positive for THC?

    A lawyer is looking into this.

  • Which medical providers can legally prescribe medical marijuana to patients?

    Before January 2021, any Utah-licensed Advanced Practice Registered Nurse (APRN), Doctor of Medicine (MD), Doctor of Osteopathy (DO), or Physician Assistant (PA) who holds a controlled substance license can recommend medical cannabis treatment to a patient with a qualifying condition.

  • How much medical marijuana is a qualified patient allowed to possess at one time?

    You may NOT possess more than 113 grams of unprocessed cannabis (raw bud or flower in blister packs. And you may NOT possess more than 20 grams of total composite THC in all other dosage forms.

  • Will I lose my job or be kicked out of my apartment for having medical marijuana?

    Based on updates to the Utah Medical Marijuana Act in 2019 there are limited protections for state and local government employees that make medical marijuana use the same as an opioid or other prescription medication. This protects those employees from being fired but does not protect them if they come to work high or perform poorly at the job because of medical marijuana.

    Private employers can still discipline or fire someone for using medical marijuana if they have such a policy.

    There are also no protections for renters who get evicted from their apartments because of medical marijuana.

    Alternatively, using marijuana without a medical card in Utah is always illegal and you risk losing your job.

Contact Us For More Information

Call us at:

(801) 851-5554

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