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What to Expect in This Episode

Episode 99 of Utah in the Weeds is the second in a two-part discussion with canna-therapist Clifton Uckerman. Clif has quite an interesting life story, and his background has helped to enrich his occupation as a cannabis-affirming therapist.

Podcast Transcript

Tim Pickett:
Welcome everyone out to episode 99 of Utah in the Weeds. My name is Tim Pickett and I’m so excited. We’re coming up on episode 100 next week. I’m going to do it. Today is the second half of the interview and discussion that I had with Clifton Uckerman. He is a licensed clinical therapist and if you are not subscribed, go ahead and subscribe so you can go back and find last week’s episode and start it from the beginning, understand Cliff’s story. Where he comes from, where he’s headed, what he has lived through with really surrounding drug use and his family and his personal experiences and how he is developing that into a treatment for the shame molecule, as he calls it. And today, we get into that a little bit and prime that discussion for future episodes and future discussions. Very great conversation with Cliff today.

Tim Pickett:
From a housekeeping perspective, join me at Utah Cann, the third annual business conference and consumer expo utahcann.com, that’s U-T-A-H-C-A-N-N.com. It is May 13th and 14th, next Friday and Saturday, at the Utah State Fair Park. You can get your tickets today. You can search our social media at utahmarijuana.org. We’ll have info about those tickets. And I’m really excited to go down there. There’s a lot of panels. We have our own staff. Melissa Reid will be on the panel. We have, I believe Amber Stachitus is speaking about women and cannabis. And Cliff, of course, will be there. And I will be there. We’ll try to record down there as well like we did on 4/20 if you haven’t listened to that episode, that’s fun. That was a couple of weeks ago. Just exciting things as we’re getting out into the open again and the world is opening back up.

Tim Pickett:
So enjoy this episode and looking forward to coming to you next week with episode 100. Stay tuned. Enjoy.

Tim Pickett:
When did you start practicing? Right after you got your masters and licensing?

Clifton Uckerman:
Yeah. 2011. I worked at Odyssey House.

Tim Pickett:
Wow. Why wouldn’t you? You grew up here?

Clifton Uckerman:
Right. My dad was in Odyssey House for a little bit.

Tim Pickett:
Yeah.

Clifton Uckerman:
Just for a little bit before he got kicked out.

Tim Pickett:
Yeah. So I mean, yeah, you’re really just literally giving back to the community that you were raised in.

Clifton Uckerman:
Mm-hmm. And then from there, I just love … It’s not like I love being in charge or love to lead. It’s just that those tend to be the positions that I gravitate towards or that call for me. So from there, I just have been in leadership administrative management positions. Still doing direct service but helping with organizational growth, helping organizational culture change, with improving and enhancing service delivery systems with increasing the volume. And aiding in the retention of clients and building communities. Any organization that I’ve ever been at or helped to either start or improve, it seems to be that my energy and passion and the teams that I get to work with and build and create, bring things to life a little bit.

Tim Pickett:
Yeah. Okay. So question now is, and partly because this is a cannabis podcast, is you left cannabis behind because it was bad.

Clifton Uckerman:
Hated it.

Tim Pickett:
Yeah. And it was-

Clifton Uckerman:
[inaudible 00:04:30].

Tim Pickett:
… part of the story of all the negative things that were happening to you as a child.

Clifton Uckerman:
Well plus I ended up with cannabis-induced psychosis when I was about 18. So I remember calling the cops on myself and hearing lots of voices thinking people were trying to kill me and hearing a lot of different things inside of my brain. And the cops came one night and they said, “Oh, we’re dealing with a 51-50.” And I turned my back on them and went into my home, literally. And they just left.

Tim Pickett:
They were like, “Oh, he’ll be fine.”

Clifton Uckerman:
Yeah. But I did smoke. I smoked a lot of weed from 12 to 18 until I had the psychotic episode. And I got scared. And then I really hated it because I associated it with all of the turmoil and destruction that was happening in my world, in my life, and with my family but-

Tim Pickett:
So you were anti-cannabis with the people you were around as well?

Clifton Uckerman:
Yeah. Or I just avoided it all together. And still, a lot of my friends and family still use. I mean my brother, before he died, he had diabetes and glaucoma because of the diabetes and he went blind for a good year. And when he really took up using marijuana, his vision came back. Not all the way but partially. And so for up until he died, he could still drive and get himself around and go shopping and watch TV. But before that, he could not see anything at all. He was completely blind.

Tim Pickett:
Wow. When did it come back to you or … So you’re 18. You have this event. You associate cannabis with a lot of these negative things that have happened. You hate it.

Clifton Uckerman:
Right.

Tim Pickett:
And you become … Did you get all the way through your masters program-

Clifton Uckerman:
Without.

Tim Pickett:
… without cannabis? You’re hating it clear through then?

Clifton Uckerman:
No. I think in my mid-20s and early 30s, I started to come back to it a little bit more. I was really afraid of it because I didn’t want the paranoia, I didn’t want the voices, I didn’t want the psychosis.

Tim Pickett:
Well that makes it both negative. So not only is the stigma and the association negative, but the experience was negative too. So it really … I mean I wouldn’t have been surprised if you’d never come back to it.

Clifton Uckerman:
Right, yeah. I think for me, it’s more of a social justice matter. Because still, if all my friends and all my family are going to use it then there’s got to be benefit and value to it. And I really am not happy with the existing and the historical criminalization that happens. Not happy with people that get arrested and charged.

Clifton Uckerman:
Here’s where I think that now that I’m thinking about it. The turning point was when I was running the CATS program, the addiction treatment program in the Old County Jail. One of the earlier jobs that I had out of my masters program. And I was working with two pods, 67 guys on one side, 56 guys on the other side, running addiction treatment services in each of those little communities. Community-based, community model, community therapeutic model. And so many of them were being violated. They would leave the jail, they completed their addiction treatment program, they got their certificate. Two weeks later, they were right back. And my question was, “What the hell? What are you …” “Because I got violated.” “Violated for what?” “A dirty drug test.”

Tim Pickett:
A dirty drug test.

Clifton Uckerman:
“For what?”

Tim Pickett:
I peed dirty.

Clifton Uckerman:
“For bud, for smoking bud. And it was a violation.” So I would say, when I worked there, 80 percent of the guys in there were actually only back in there because of a violation.

Tim Pickett:
So they would come in, they knew the whole program, they were stellar residents.

Clifton Uckerman:
Residents, yeah.

Tim Pickett:
They were stellar residents, they knew all the rules. They did their thing. They got out. And then …

Clifton Uckerman:
The other problem there is a lot of them would come in with opiate addictions, heroin addictions. And this is the height of the opioid epidemic, 2015, 2016. So they would come in, their tolerance would go down because now they’re locked up and they’re not using anymore. And a lot of times, if they can get out and just use marijuana, that helps-

Tim Pickett:
Deal [inaudible 00:09:18]-

Clifton Uckerman:
… delay the urges, cravings, and impulses. That can extend their sobriety. That can help them manage their urges, cravings to use. And so … But what happens is because they can’t use marijuana, then they’re right back to heroin. And because their tolerance is low, they die and overdose.

Clifton Uckerman:
And so although a lot of them are coming back for violations, a lot that were on heroin coming in, ended up dying when they got out because they went back to using and didn’t have any buffer, didn’t have any [inaudible 00:09:49], didn’t have anything else as a medicine or a medication that they could use to extend their lives and delay return to use of more iris drugs.

Tim Pickett:
Do you think there’s something to being able to self-dose cannabis compared to other medications? You talk about people getting out of an institutional treatment setting and not really having access to self-dose medications. They’re on a few medications probably that are prescribed. And if they run out, they’ve got to get a visit, they’ve got to go in, they’ve got to go through some hoops to get that back. And on the other hand, you also have this … You can’t dose an anti-depressant or another drug. You just get what you get. You can’t take more on a bad day, less on a good day. Less if you got to go to work. I think there’s something to having a sense of control.

Clifton Uckerman:
Right. Well that … So there’s another angle to this too which is there’s an over representation of minorities in the criminal justice system, people of color, right? So if people from communities of color, if they have better and greater access to marijuana but less and more restrictive access to traditional, mainstream psychiatry and other things like that, then what’s going to happen is they’re going to get out, they don’t have the access. A lot of times, they get disqualified. Like I get really angry when people of color go into the doctor, go in for a visit, and they get turned away. Or they don’t get the help. Or they get forced on something that really isn’t what they’re asking for or needing. And that happens a lot.

Tim Pickett:
It still happens. For people who don’t believe in it, we study it in med school that it still happens. It’s embedded. There’s no other way to describe why it happens. It’s just embedded.

Clifton Uckerman:
I think there is an implicit bias though with historical, in a white society, an implicit bias, people of color come in and we tend to look at them as crazy, impoverished, poverty-mindset, entitled, and med-seeking and an addict. And they just want what they want and we’re not going to let them have their way.

Tim Pickett:
Right, we know better.

Clifton Uckerman:
So I think for somebody, especially people coming from communities of color, I think it’s important that whatever they have access to already, let’s build on the strength of that.

Clifton Uckerman:
And then my deal was, in the last couple of years, especially with the legalization of medical marijuana, was if they are already accessing that and subscribing to it and there is some key benefit or value to it, let’s legitimize it and then help them get off the streets and away from synthetics and into a medical program where they can be educated on dosing and not getting in trouble for it or get violated or go back to jail because they have a history of charges with that medicine, with that substance.

Tim Pickett:
Going to turn it on their head. Basically, use the anti-system to fix the system.

Clifton Uckerman:
Yeah. And now, if they have choice and freedom over what they’re dosing and how they’re dosing, a lot of times … So it’s kind of a manipulation that I use in therapy. But if I can help them divert their attention from alcohol and other drugs that carry greater risks and are more lethal, especially when combined and interacting with each other, and I can use little therapeutic strategies to divert their attention away from that. And divert their attention to medical cannabis and going through the process and getting a card and in the dispensary, now, they’re distracted by something that they actually feel like they have a little bit of choice and control and that they get to trial and error with and experiment and they’re not going to die. They might get a little high. They might have a little bit of anxiety. But guess what? They can always come back in and talk to me, or you, about it.

Tim Pickett:
Yeah.

Clifton Uckerman:
And we just integrate the experience and then we help them learn how to continually improve.

Tim Pickett:
Shit. You might have cracked the code. Let me distract you. Here’s something that’s really cool, right?

Clifton Uckerman:
No. But it’s bringing something that, to me, is kind of a logical algorithmic approach to a certain set of behavioral issues that you got to work through. Because primarily, to me, I always look at time. You need time. You need this person to get more time away from the substance they’re addicted to or using or the situation or the thought breakdown. You need time. Because time will heal the body and the brain itself. Different experiences are used as adjunct therapy and different thought process, you usually can teach people. But that all requires time and distraction gives you that time. That’s cool.

Tim Pickett:
If you get them distracted for a month or two on this little pathway that they’re trying to figure things out and trial and error and experiment with, there’s your time. Not only do you get the time and you distract them, but like you say, you’ve distracted them with something that is, they have some control over or they’re going to learn that they have control over it. And it might even be beneficial.

Clifton Uckerman:
Right.

Tim Pickett:
Right?

Clifton Uckerman:
Right.

Tim Pickett:
Because of the way cannabis works on the brain, we definitely know it can open up new thought pathways. It can let people deal with things. Talk a little bit about that, how you’ve really in Utah, pioneered this, in my opinion. But utilizing cannabis in therapy.

Clifton Uckerman:
It’s different for everybody because every patient is in a different place in their relationship with the medicine. And at a different point in time in their life from one to the next. And so some examples are, so right now, with the way that the laws are, with the medical cannabis program, PTSD is the only qualifying condition. Now there’s a lot of people out there that are advocating for every other mental health issue to be a part of that qualifying condition. But if you think about it, every other mental health condition, you could probably attribute to some kind of trauma. And you could probably tie that trauma to a diagnosis of PTSD. So I’m happy that PTSD is the only qualifying condition right now. We can focus on that and learn how to work with it and around it. And when we don’t have to spend our time and energy on trying to lobby and advocate for every other mental health stuff.

Tim Pickett:
No. We just need to talk to people and get to the bottom of their issue.

Clifton Uckerman:
Trauma.

Tim Pickett:
And their trauma.

Clifton Uckerman:
Yeah.

Tim Pickett:
Yeah.

Clifton Uckerman:
Because what I say is, the next five or ten years, the DSN will really take a better look at generational trauma, gender trauma, religious trauma, racial trauma, and a lot of this mental health stuff, all these mental health conditions will be trauma-oriented or focused on the trauma.

Clifton Uckerman:
So in therapy, what we do is we treat the PTSD. So the easy explanation is, so the trauma, the negative life-impacting experience that contributes to the detrimental development … Detrimental development is all that cognitive errors and thinking cognitive flaws, the negative, self-defeating thoughts that I begin to have the intrusive voice as those negative faults, beliefs. The detrimental development is something happens in my life, especially when I’m young, like zero to 15-years-old. I’m a really selfish kid. I come out of the womb designed to be that way. Because if I’m not selfish, if the world doesn’t revolve around me and I’m not the center of everyone’s universe, I won’t get clothed, fed, bathed, sheltered. So a kid is really selfish and designed that way and appropriately so.

Clifton Uckerman:
So the earlier the traumas, whatever kind of trauma it is, the more detrimental development is going to occur. And that detrimental development, the way that that kid internalizes the trauma, is the way that they see that when the world revolves around them and they’re the center of the universe is, “Oh my gosh, I did something to cause this. It’s my fault. I’m to blame. I’m bad. I’m no good. I’m unlovable. Nobody loves me. I might as well just go kill myself.” That’s trauma.

Clifton Uckerman:
So what happens is that trauma gets imprinted into … It gets mind-stemmed into the earlier parts of the developing brain which later on become the mid or the hind part of the brain, the cerebellum, the amygdala. And in that little trauma stamp inside of the brain, the only way for it to become a memory and stay there is for it to embed, to be embedded in it, the shame molecule. And that shame molecule is what gets triggered as we get older in the rest of our lives which tells us, “Uh oh, avoid this. Stay away from it. It’s too painful. You don’t want to go through this again.”

Tim Pickett:
Yeah, but it’s stored and I see … So this is a good map-making explanation of it because it becomes the emotional part of the brain, the amygdala, where you don’t … You have a hard time articulating what that looks like. You have to learn how to articulate it from a feelings standpoint and what you feel like. But it is super effective and it is the only part of the brain that’s still alive in fight or flight situations, right?

Clifton Uckerman:
Yes, yes.

Tim Pickett:
You don’t use your frontal lobe.

Clifton Uckerman:
No.

Tim Pickett:
And it creates callused connections to the frontal lobe where it knows it can get its signal across. And a lot of times, those are … They’re terrible connections because they just put you back into the negative spiral.

Clifton Uckerman:
That’s what we call the short-circuiting. It’s short-circuited, right?

Tim Pickett:
Yep.

Clifton Uckerman:
Which is why we react so instantly and react so heavy and react so negatively to some things that had those traumas not been there, we probably wouldn’t even be perceiving it in that kind of way.

Tim Pickett:
No. It’s not logical. If you were able to step back, and people with PTSD from specific traumatic events, once they’re able to step back and get that perspective on what happened at the time, that’s part of the process of healing, right?

Clifton Uckerman:
Right.

Tim Pickett:
And what’s interesting about cannabis, is it softens those short-circuit connections.

Clifton Uckerman:
It softens it. It uses your endocannabinoid system and those EC receptors to open things up. Think about it. You have all those endocannabinoid receptors in your central nervous system, in your immune system. So if my central nervous system is hijacked and my brain is short-circuited and I have this trauma with the shame molecule, then the cannabis is going to come in, open things up, decompress, and soften things out. Give me time to really think about things and talk about things. If I feel safe enough with the therapist that I’m with, I unwrap the trauma memory because it’s holding onto that shame molecule pretty tight. And once I unwrap or unpack the trauma memory, I can release and relinquish the shame molecule.

Clifton Uckerman:
And a lot of times, the shame molecule comes out in tears. A lot of emotional expression. It’s very painful. That’s why people avoid it and they don’t want to talk about it. But it has to come out in the tears because the tears are what carry the shame molecule out of the system, out of the brain and out of the body. And the cannabis helps people to get there. And once you do the education, then they can dose and go down that road, talk about the trauma, release the shame molecule, have a really good cry, and begin to feel better.

Clifton Uckerman:
There’s a chemical reaction that takes place. So when I cry, and I’ve just done some trauma-focused work, the oxytocin levels rise in my brain. And what the oxytocin wants to do is go in and prune all of those old neurons that was storing all of that old, negative psyche. Energy that shame molecule so it begins the pruning process and it helps with neurogenesis so I can begin to establish new neural pathways inside of my brain but the only thing that’s going to help me develop new neural pathways inside my brain is sitting there having a conversation with somebody that finally, in the first time in my life, shows me that they care enough to listen and understand and hear me and empathize with me so I can get this stuff out without judgment. And so now, I’m going through memory reconsolidation and my oxytocin levels are pruning. I’m going through neurogenesis, neural pathways are happening inside of my brain.

Clifton Uckerman:
This can cause a lot of anxiety for a person because it’s new and it’s fearful because it’s unknown. And so after a really good session, even with the relief of a really good cry and releasing all of that shame molecule, anxiety increases, anxiety disrupts sleep patterns. And so the patient will probably want to dose to manage the anxiety and to get good sleep and prepare coming back to the next session so they can continue that process of doing trauma-focused work.

Tim Pickett:
When did you figure this out?

Clifton Uckerman:
The years that I’ve been working with people, all the research and studying that I’ve been doing. But there’s an algorithm so I’ve worked with probably … Oh gosh, at least 8000 or more people by now. And when I listen intently and I’m trying to understand and I’m really thinking deeply about what they’re going through and what they’ve been through and I compare that from one patient to the next, there’s a pattern. There’s an algorithm. Right?

Tim Pickett:
Yep.

Clifton Uckerman:
And-

Tim Pickett:
We are animals. We’re all human.

Clifton Uckerman:
We’re all human.

Tim Pickett:
And we tend to repeat, the behaviors repeat, the stories repeat. Different details, same story.

Clifton Uckerman:
And with all the literature and all the research from a lot of different disciplines. Like I’m very eclectic and so I pull from the medical model. I pull from psychiatry. I pull from neuropsychotherapy. I pull from epigenetics. I pull from a lot of different theories of mind that exist in different disciplines. That’s what I like about social work is that’s, I think, the training of a social worker is we’re trained to pull from everything, lots of different things, and then we put it all together and make the connections and say, “Gosh. All of this body of knowledge from all these different disciplines. If we can bring that together and really understand how it’s all connected …” That’s what I’ve been able to do to help people more.

Tim Pickett:
Feels like we’re on the cusp of really accepting this locally, especially. And I don’t know of other programs that are like this, that are like yours. U’s really opening up to the idea, even, even really just opening up to the idea, that cannabis can be used as a therapeutic tool. I think there is some … We have these conversations. There’s discussions about cannabis and psilocybin use in spiritual, religious experiences. But I don’t … I’ve never, until I met you and this cannabis-affirming therapy, I didn’t really know anybody who was utilizing it specifically as a way to help people release, really. Right?

Clifton Uckerman:
Right, right.

Tim Pickett:
And I’m really excited about it.

Clifton Uckerman:
Yeah.

Tim Pickett:
What I like about it is it fits a logical pattern for my medically-trained brain.

Clifton Uckerman:
There’s a formula.

Tim Pickett:
There is a formula. There’s an algorithm. There’s a formula. It makes sense to me. There’s not a lot of hocus pocus. And so I feel like it can be something that the medical community can actually get behind. Especially because it’s guided by a trained professional. We trust you in the traditional, synthetic medical society, we trust the therapist. Because you’re trained. You’re trained in our same system. And we, I mean it seems like, doctors need that trust. It’s just so important, the legitimacy. So I see this type of program really … I don’t know. I feel like it can find the legitimacy. And then you go back to your history and your story growing up and your credential now. And now you’re involved in teaching people at the University of Utah which offers a lot. And the credibility. You’ve had the credibility to get the position at the U. You have to have credibility. You have to have … You can’t just have one piece of the puzzle. You got to have the whole thing done.

Clifton Uckerman:
Yeah. I did my Colloquium and in my presentation to the school, the College of Social Work, my last slide is, “And if you accept me, my current study, my current field of study is treating PTSD in conjunction with medical cannabis from the lens of a trauma-focused and of an approach in consideration of generational trauma, racial trauma, historical trauma.” All that kind of stuff. And so that was out there on the table.

Clifton Uckerman:
My first day, the other day, going in there to get some of my books for the summer semester, one of the first people that came to me and said congratulations said, “And I love that you affirm medical cannabis because I am a medical cannabis patient too.” And I think now the door’s opening and people are talking about it and we get to do more education. We get to maybe think about finding ways to get support to invite that into curriculum and bringing that back into the community. And do you know what I love about this industry is that it’s inclusive of everybody. And we all get to talk about it.

Tim Pickett:
Yeah. I love this community. It’s been really fun. The people on all sides from the physicians and the PAs and MPs to the therapists and clear to the growers and the processors, the people who use it, patients. And it really is all about the people who utilize the plant. I mean what it all comes down to it, we all essentially work for the same thing.

Clifton Uckerman:
We’re all connected.

Tim Pickett:
Yeah, we’re all connecting.

Clifton Uckerman:
To the same thing.

Tim Pickett:
Yeah. I’ve found it a really fun and rewarding place to work. It seems like there’s only good people, almost. I’m sure we’ll find a couple of bad eggs.

Clifton Uckerman:
Here and there.

Tim Pickett:
Here and there.

Clifton Uckerman:
Some are malleable. Some are changing.

Tim Pickett:
They just need a little session. They just need to have a good cry.

Clifton Uckerman:
A little bit of love.

Tim Pickett:
I’ve heard you say that to a few … Just need a good cry. Release that shame molecule. What have we missed for the first two episodes that we’re working on together?

Clifton Uckerman:
So you and I have … So first of all, I can’t let this opportunity go by without thanking you and appreciating you, Mr. Tim Pickett. I still have on my phone, I keep your first voicemail that you ever sent me.

Tim Pickett:
Really?

Clifton Uckerman:
[inaudible 00:31:06]. I just want to see if it will. I don’t know if it will here in the studio. But it was 4/18, oh my gosh, of 2020.

Tim Pickett:
4/18. So almost two years ago, day before my birthday. We’re about to come up on that … record.

Tim Pickett:
[inaudible 00:31:28] giving you a call. I thought to entertain how we could work together because PTSD is one of the very interesting qualifications for medical cannabis and I think anxiety is a reasonable option as well for patients who want to navigate the Compassionate Use Board. But I would need a little bit of help from somebody like yourself. And I think there’s ways we could work together. So go ahead and give me a call back any time. I think Monday might be best. [inaudible 00:32:04].

Tim Pickett:
I got a lot to say.

Clifton Uckerman:
But I keep that in my voicemail because I think that was the pivotal moment of being able to get to where we are right now.

Tim Pickett:
Yeah, wow. That’s a while ago. It feels like a lifetime ago.

Clifton Uckerman:
Yeah.

Tim Pickett:
I mean April 18th, the first dispensary had opened, Dragonfly was opening. The phone was ringing off the hook. I didn’t know what the hell I was doing. We were just trying to see as many people as we could and navigate the system. And I didn’t know anything about PTSD. I’m glad we connected, no question. It’s been fun because the programs that you worked on and everything that I’ve learned about you has always … You have a very impressive resume. Your history is just phenomenal. You cannot overstate the value of what you’ve been through, what you’ve learned. So for me, working with somebody like you is just a way to help a lot of people. Which like we said, in the very beginning, you help people and that’s what makes business do well. And then your business does well, you can help more people.

Clifton Uckerman:
Right. Much appreciation too. I think one of the things that we got to talk about is get more into the shame molecule and neuroscience and that formula. I’d love to really share that formula and really help patients understand what they’re going to get when they sign up for trauma-focused therapy when we’re using medical cannabis in conjunction with that. And what the outcome is that we can achieve together. And usually, it’s life-changing.

Tim Pickett:
Yeah. And I’m sure I’ve got some, hopefully, some things I can add to that. We can really get into that. So let’s do another couple of sessions and talk all about the science and the approach and what it’s like for people, what that experience is like for people. I’m excited.

Clifton Uckerman:
Yeah.

Tim Pickett:
So to wrap this piece up, I’m Tim Pickett, host of Utah in the Weeds. Clifton Uckerman, Medical Director of the Behavioral Health Program at Utah Therapeutic Health Center. If you have any questions, 801-851-5554 is our phone number. Utahmarijuana.org. You can find us both there. You can find access to Behavioral Health Therapy, therapists, that are really cannabis-affirming. Is that the-

Clifton Uckerman:
Yeah.

Tim Pickett:
That’s a good term for that?

Clifton Uckerman:
Yeah.

Tim Pickett:
And can help also. That program, from a therapy standpoint, Cliff, almost all insurances your paneled on for the behavioral and health therapy sessions?

Clifton Uckerman:
Yes, yes.

Tim Pickett:
So this is a great way for people to get access into the medical cannabis program and get help and for a copay, right?

Clifton Uckerman:
Yep.

Tim Pickett:
Get the help they need.

Clifton Uckerman:
Yep.

Tim Pickett:
We can talk all about that, too.

Clifton Uckerman:
Yes.

Tim Pickett:
That’s like an entire episode, how we’re working within and outside the system in a really legal way. And to help people navigate this whole thing, I think that’s a whole nother conversation that I’m excited to have later.

Clifton Uckerman:
Yes.

Tim Pickett:
But anyway, utahmarijuana.org, Utah in the Weeds, subscribe and stay safe out there.

Clifton Uckerman:
Thanks, everybody.

 

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