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Utah in the Weeds Episode #97 – How Utah Celebrates 4/20

What to Expect in This Episode

Cannabis pharmacies around the state held several 4/20 events this year. Tim stopped by three of those events and talked with industry professionals, patients, advocates, and others involved with Medical Cannabis.

This episode also includes Clifton Uckerman’s keynote speech at the Dragonfly Wellness 4/20 event in Salt Lake City.

Podcast Transcript

Tim Pickett:
Welcome, everybody, out to Utah in the Weeds. This is Episode 97. We’re getting there, folks. Almost there. I’m Tim Pickett, the host. And today, we’re celebrating 4/20. A little bit late, but I wanted you to hear some of the clips that I recorded during the day. Lots of people’s thoughts and attitudes about the cannabis holiday, cannabis Christmas. And it was a fun, fun day here in Utah. Lot of enjoyment and excitement around the Utah Medical Cannabis Program. We were at Beehive Medical Cannabis Farmacy. We were at Dragonfly Medical Cannabis Pharmacy in Downtown Salt Lake. Also, I started out at Wholesome in Bountiful. There were events down in Deseret Wellness in Provo and Park City. There were sales all over so people could stock up on their medicine. And one of the things that I noticed is there’s so much love for the patients here in Utah and how this program is growing and really just expanding to help people.

Tim Pickett:
So enjoy this episode. We’re getting close. If you’re not subscribed, subscribe to Utah in the Weeds. You can find us anywhere, iTunes Podcast. We’ve got a lot more great content coming up. Make sure you’re tuned in for next week. Clifton Uckerman, part one of a two-part series of the beginning of his story, the Canna-Therapist here in Utah now. He was a panel speaker and the keynote speaker at the 4/20 Dragonfly event. A little bit about that in this episode as well. Enjoy. So basically what I was going to do is I’m just going to go around everywhere I go today and ask people how they feel about 4/20, the program, who they are, what the hell they’re doing, right?

Julian Miranda:
So my name is Julian Miranda. I’m the Community Engagement Manager for WholesomeCo. I’ve been with them for just over a year and I’ve been having an awesome time just getting to know the greater cannabis community here in Utah.

Tim Pickett:
So what does 4/20 mean to you, Julian?

Julian Miranda:
So 4/20 to me, obviously first and foremost, it’s a day to celebrate just this cannabis plant, the amazing properties it has not only as a medicine, but as an industrial product such as hemp. There’s so many applications for it. But today at WholesomeCo, we’re actually trying to make it a point to bring awareness to our patients about expungement, about the social inequity that’s going on with the war on drugs. We’re going to be joined by [inaudible 00:02:41]. They are a citizen-forward profit company that is going to be doing expungement through the Clean Slate Act, which is automatically expunging criminal records for people. And so [inaudible 00:02:58] going to be out here talking about the expungement process and just bringing awareness to that for our patients. So we’re really excited to have them out here and used to be serving all our patients all day long.

Tim Pickett:
Jared, tell us about the flower.

Jared Ulmer:
Yeah, super excited about it. My favorite is Tricross right now. We’ve got that in 3.5 gram units. There’s also Gorilla OG, Gummy Bears and Froot by the Foot. Some newer strands that we’ve released. We’ve had Gorilla OG before, but those other three are new this time around and Tricross is actually my favorite of this bunch, the most potent and good stuff. All of our flowers are greenhouse grown with the sun, supplemental LEDs as well. Yeah, got a nice brand new greenhouse up there and it’s looking good.

Tim Pickett:
Kylee.

Kylee Shumway:
I am not 100% sure how 4/20 came about.

Tim Pickett:
Yeah, it was the Waldos. You know what you should do is you should watch this YouTube channel that I have, it’s called Discover Marijuana. He talks about the Waldos, they were in high school, right? They were in high school and they used to meet after something at… They got done at four o’clock so they’d meet over on this wall, and it was next to a statue of Louis Pasteur and they would smoke weed at 4/20. And then one of them, or their dad, was a base roadie for The Grateful Dead and that’s how the story got out was they were part of the Grateful Dead roadie crew. And so there you go, lesson learned. Do you have a lot of new patients here today?

Kylee Shumway:
Yeah. We have a ton of new patients here today. My pharmacists are almost full. I almost don’t have any appointments left. Why today?

Tim Pickett:
Adam. Adam Toller who was on our podcast, I don’t even know what episode it was. Do you remember the number? Who knows what number, it was last summer. But it was a good episode and you’re doing walk-in visits today. I’m interested what you think of 4/20 as a provider.

Adam Toller:
I think that 4/20 means good people, good weed, good fun. And as a provider, yeah, it’s all about helping people and this is a great time to come in and see us and get evaluated for your conditions and get the help you need.

Tim Pickett:
Yeah. I think from a provider, from my standpoint too, I think it’s just exposing the plant to more people no matter what way it is, because sometimes we’re going to expose it through parties like this and discounts and things. And then other times, you’re going to expose it through people being addicted to opioids and having to get off of them and that other traditional what we would be used to as providers. But I don’t feel like it matters how you get exposed as long as you get exposed and the experience wasn’t negative.

Adam Toller:
Correct. I absolutely agree with that. I think that having a good positive experience with cannabis in a good environment can really bring about healing and uplifting to the patients. So events like this could be a great way to be introduced to cannabis.

Lara Lucas:
I’m Lara Lucas. I’m a patient navigator over here at Utah Therapeutic. It’s a great day for 4/20, it’s beautiful, sun is shining. I love seeing everyone in their canna gear and it’s like Christmas over here.

Tim Pickett:
You’ve been with us for about a year and a half. How has your involvement in the cannabis space changed you?

Lara Lucas:
It’s changed me by seeing how much it helps people. We have all ages, all religions. I come in to work every day looking forward to hearing people’s stories on medications they’re not taking anymore and how happy this makes them. And it makes me happy to be able to help people and hear their stories.

Tim Pickett:
That’s cool. Thanks, Lara.

JD Lauritzen:
So my name’s JD Lauritzen and what 4/20 means to me is really activism. I know we celebrate it a lot as a more corporate holiday, a consumption holiday. I like to look at it more from activism and that’s really what we’re doing here at WholesomeCo today. 4.2% of all sales today will be going to Mission Green to help get cannabis prisoners out of prison. So for us, it’s a day of activism and a day giving back.

Tim Pickett:
Wow, that is cool. 4.2%?

JD Lauritzen:
Yes. 4.2% of all sales will go to Mission Green. And yeah, they’re an activism group that helps to get federal cannabis prisoners out of prison. So our money will help do that.

Tim Pickett:
One of the things I love about this whole industry is we do these fun little things about 4/20, right? We ask for $4.20 donations from patients. We donate 4.2% to Mission Green here at Wholesome today. It makes it fun. It makes us all a community, don’t you think?

JD Lauritzen:
That’s right. I mean today to me, I know I understand some people may have certain feelings about the word 4/20, but it’s more than that, right? This isn’t just about consumption and being a stoner and all that stuff. It truly started as a day of activism. So that’s what we see it as and that’s how we’ve positioned it and we’re having a great time out here today. We’re really excited, a company called [inaudible 00:08:02] will be out here today to talk about expungements with people and we’re excited to announce next month some stuff that we’re going to do with them. So yeah, this is the first step in a number of avenues that we’re going to take to give back and help people, try to do our best to help repair some of the harms of the war on drugs.

Dylan Rowe:
My name is Dylan Rowe and I did eight years in the Marines. I was an infantry squad leader, did a couple tours to Sangin, got hurt and came home and ran into the benzos and the opiates and everything that was being prescribed and was really unhealthy. My family life started to fall apart. I switched to medical cannabis in 2018 and got off of every single thing that I was on. Lost 75 pounds. Went to school for psychology, got my degree. And now, I’m a local beekeeper.

Tim Pickett:
You’re a beekeeper?

Dylan Rowe:
Yeah. Yeah. I just started this year. It’s something I really wanted to do towards the tail end of my degree. And I have four hives in Davis County and just been trying to promote positive vibes and live life.

Tim Pickett:
You switched to cannabis in 2018. I mean it sounds like from even the short story you’ve given me that that was part of a big change for you.

Dylan Rowe:
It was huge. Biggest thing, I wasn’t afraid of dying at night. I didn’t have to carry a Narcan anymore. My wife and I started to develop a whole new relationship. It was filled with love and trust and understanding, and she was really happy and really proud of me for making the decision to just turn in all my medications and cold turkey it. And I mean it hurt for a while, but medical cannabis literally saved my life. I probably would not be here if it wasn’t for it and the push in Utah.

Tim Pickett:
Why come out on 4/20?

Dylan Rowe:
Oh, why not come out on 4/20? The environment, everybody that is here. These are the type of people I want to be around. They’re the type of people that I have found have accepted me for who I am and the decisions that I’ve made. It’s not an educated thing to smoke weed for pain or for anxiety or anything, PTSD. And it’s a lot safer. It’s a lot healthier.

Tim Pickett:
Awesome, man. Thanks. I appreciate you.

Dylan Rowe:
Yeah, absolutely. Thank you for spearheading it, Tim. It hadn’t been for you making the push and doing everything that you have done, people like me would’ve been left through the cracks and probably been another victim of the opioid epidemic that’s going on in the state.

Jose Perez:
My name is Jose Perez and I’m owner of [inaudible 00:10:55] food truck. And for the most part, we’re happy to be out here celebrating 4/20. It’s a holiday that it goes under the radar, but it’s actually very popular throughout my culture. And it’s something that we really like and we’re happy to be a part of it.

Alex Bismuke:
My name’s Alex, I’m with WholesomeCo. So 4/20 is a celebration of the medicine and the culture, where it comes together where people get to experience culture, they get to experience the history of cannabis in our country and the world and they also get great relief from pain.

Tim Pickett:
This next section is going to be at Beehive Medical Cannabis Pharmacy. Hi, I’m Tim.

Melissa:
Melissa. I’m a caregiver of a patient. The journey’s been long and it’s been me resisting several parts of it along the way, but I’m warming up and I’m trying to learn and be supportive and know that it helps.

Billy Bitter:
So I’m Billy and 4/20 means to me, I feel like it’s just the day of destigmatizing cannabis use too where it’s just everyone’s celebrating, everyone knows 4/20 even before I smoked pot, oh wait, that’s the wrong way to say it, used cannabis. Even before I used cannabis, it was before I was medicating, it was still just like, “Ha ha, 4/20, blaze it.” There’s pictures of me on my mission holding a clock at exactly 4:20 on 4/20 because I thought it was funny. So it’s just this day of recognizing marijuana I guess as just part of a cultural moment.

Tim Pickett:
Okay, so you graduated from the Y.

Billy Bitter:
Yes.

Tim Pickett:
Here, we all know what that means. So did you do anything on 4/20 when you were in school?

Billy Bitter:
Yes. But according to them, no. It was very under the wraps because BYU is very anti any drug, alcohol, any use like that. So I had my little house in Provo that me and my friends just went into the backyard and lit up a little bit.

Tim Pickett:
You may have partaken.

Billy Bitter:
And may or may not have partaken allegedly. But it was a fun little time and it was just like the Waldos with the 4/20 story, right? 4:20, going to the statue, lighting up, having a good time.

Tim Pickett:
Sweet. Okay, who’s next? Courtney.

Courtney Lipscomb:
4/20 now because I work here with you is like the Christmas season in one day. So it means I’m busy. But when I was younger, it meant stuff that maybe wasn’t legal. Don’t put that in the podcast. Can I? Okay. I guess. I mean I was younger in high school, college. I had a group of friends that we would hang out on 4/20 and do the 4/20 things. And now, I get paid to do the 4/20 things.

Tim Pickett:
I think it’s even funny how people… Even now, we’re like, “Oh wait,” just the way we say it, just the way we still talk about it. We’re just not all the way there, right? We’re just not all the way.

Courtney Lipscomb:
Yeah. Immediately I was like, “Oh my God, my mom’s going to hear me say that.” So she fully knows now. I’ve been doing this for two years now, so she knows. But yeah.

Tim Pickett:
Your mom’s well aware of who you are and where you work.

Samantha Simmerly:
Hi, I’m Samantha Simmerly. 4/20 to me is just a great holiday. I love the community. I feel like it brings everyone together in the cannabis community and I love that. It just makes me feel a little closer to everyone in the community. And it’s nice to feel that support. Sometimes you can feel alone and so it’s nice to have that cannabis family come together.

Tim Pickett:
What got you involved?

Samantha Simmerly:
I’ve used it off and on since probably high school. But I’ve been a patient for about a year or so. And I’ve known for the past few years though that it really helps a lot with anxiety and sleep a lot definitely.

Tim Pickett:
What’s your favorite product?

Samantha Simmerly:
Ooh. For me, it’s flower. I usually like flower the most. Yeah. Well I really liked the I think it was called Push Pop Cake.

Tim Pickett:
Oh, yeah.

Samantha Simmerly:
That one I think is [inaudible 00:15:41] I think it was the brand. I really liked that one. That one was really good.

Amber Stachitus:
Oh, do you just hold it? Okay. I wouldn’t know when to do this.

Tim Pickett:
Why?

Amber Stachitus:
Because the singer would kick in and I’d be like… Yeah, total eclipse of the… See, I’m ready. I’m ready for karaoke.

Tim Pickett:
Once you have the microphone in your hand.

Amber Stachitus:
Yeah.

Tim Pickett:
It’s songs.

Amber Stachitus:
Yeah. It’s musical. You’ve got proper mic technique.

Tim Pickett:
I was taught.

Amber Stachitus:
Where’d you learn that?

Tim Pickett:
High school musicals.

Amber Stachitus:
You had a better high school musical director. If Ms. May is listening, you were fine.

Tim Pickett:
No. So Merrily Webb was our choir director. She’s from here. I think now she directs the… And Merrily Webb, if you’re listening, you gave great mic technique. And I know that I went into the cannabis space and I think she is still the women’s choir director at BYU.

Amber Stachitus:
Oh. So you had very good education is what you’re saying. I’m Amber Stachitus and 4/20 for me, it’s just being able to celebrate that we have this medicine in our state. I think it’s important for people to be honest and open about their cannabis use. And 4/20 is an opportunity to do that because a lot of people are showing that they’re open about their cannabis use. So it’s like if you’re going to embrace it, if you’re going to step out of the closet, the canna closet, maybe 4/20 is that day for you.

Bijan Sakaki:
Bijan Sakaki with Beehive Pharmacy and Beehive Gardens. 4/20, man, that means a lot. 4/20 is a day that a lot of the culture comes out. They put in the time, it’s about the culture, the people, it’s more than just the medicine. 4/20 was a code everybody used and now it’s evolved into a day and it’s evolved into a movement. So I think it’s really important to the culture. But it’s, again, necessary to also not digress from what the plant is. Plants are here to help so let’s not lose sight of that. So 4/20 is a good day to recognize that, bring everybody together. And I think industry wise, people love it because it brings the patients out. You get deals, you get vendors, you get food trucks. It’s crazy now to see the 4/20 being recognized as a cultural day. But yeah, I think it’s important. Don’t lose sight of it. Even patients out there, don’t lose sight on why this medicine helps you. Don’t get distracted by the fancy stuff. If it’s good medicine for you, stick with it.

Tim Pickett:
Okay. So say your name and then say what’s 4/20 all about for you. When you get asked at Christmas, what’s Christmas mean to you? Okay.

Jen Makuakane:
I’m Jen Makuakane, I’ve been a Q&P here since July. Christmas means to me helping patients, 4/20 Christmas. It’s a nice break to help patients in a way that’s maybe a little bit more light and airy.

Alex Bismuke:
Hey, this is Alex Bismuke. 4/20 means to me, it’s just a group holiday. You try to get together with all your best friends, family members, celebrate it like Christmas. You hang out, have fun, enjoy the day and just be in nature where it all came from and just enjoy what’s provided for you.

Tim Pickett:
You bring up this nature thing. So it’s springtime, 4/20, you’ve got Easter’s always close by. I feel like we’re more likely to be outside. Like you say, enjoy. And there’s no real gifts associated so there’s not a lot of pressure like there is with real Christmas. I feel like with real Christmas, there’s a lot of pressure, but 4/20, there’s no pressure.

Alex Bismuke:
Exactly. Sadly, we’re not in a state where we gift medical marijuana. If we could, then I’d be definitely giving some gifts out to my buddies. But no. Yeah, no pressure, it’s all on you. Whatever you buy, it’s all for yourself. I mean unless your buddies have also medical marijuana cards and then it’s okay to share. But for there, it’s all for you. And it’s a great holiday to just enjoy, to chill, be one with nature, go out in nature, just relax, soak it all up and enjoy.

Tim Pickett:
Okay, Victor. You’ve never been on the podcast. You’ve been working with us for two years so you’ve seen a lot of patients come through as many as anybody in the whole organization, probably as many as anybody in the state. Really, you’ve probably helped more people get through the EVS system than anybody in Utah.

Victor Caruso:
Me and Katie, probably Stu as well is in that bundle.

Tim Pickett:
Yes.

Victor Caruso:
But yeah, the three of us.

Tim Pickett:
What do you like about the whole program, this whole thing, or about 4/20?

Victor Caruso:
Well I think 4/20 is the celebration of freedom. And what I like about the whole program is that it creates that freedom for people to speak about it, for people to be able to feel, able to just talk freely about this subject which is really important. It’s just medication and different ways to do it. There’s not only one way to do it now, there’s plenty which is pretty cool in my opinion.

Tim Pickett:
What makes you love your job or like your job?

Victor Caruso:
Well I was looking at all the memes they were sending today in the group chat and that was pretty cool. I was talking to my friends about it that pretty rarely you see that in a work environment where people are so happy and so festive that they share it with you basically and you feel free to share it as well.

Tim Pickett:
I like it too. I think we have a pretty good culture. This section of the recording is at Dragonfly. So we’ve moved from Beehive. I was at Wholesome earlier and went to Beehive, saw their festivities. And certainly, I will say, I mean I like everybody, but Dragonfly did the best job at getting the community together. This is better than last year. There’s food trucks out the back. There’s probably 20, 30 booths at least, a lot of people.

Beckie Meisenheimer:
I’m Beckie Meisenheimer with Pure Plan Medical. And 4/20 used to never mean anything to me until I started getting into the medical side of cannabis, which we’ve been involved in the medical side for about a year. And we’re very excited because it helps so many people. And it helps myself too because I’ve had some real bad back surgeries and hard time sleeping. And so it’s changed my life and so I wanted to get into this business to help other people in their life so they could have an alternative. Cannabis is medicine. We need to help other people understand how important it is because I’ve seen what opiates do to families.

Beckie Meisenheimer:
I see they start taking it because they’ve got pain and they can’t get off of it, and then their whole family falls apart. And when I had my back surgeries, I couldn’t take opiates. They made me sick and I would just lose them. And so it was so hard on me to have back surgery. And at that time, I discovered CBD and what it could do for people and investigated that for four years and then went from there and figured out that medical cannabis is really the key.

Tim Pickett:
What’s your favorite product that you make?

Beckie Meisenheimer:
Pure Plan Harmony. And it smells absolutely wonderful. And I wanted to create something so the people that don’t like the earthy flavor or the taste or the smell or the environment of it, I wanted to create a product with effects and be able to put them in there. So when you walk in, you can just pick this up and say, “Hey, I can use Pure Creative. I know what that would stand for. Pure Energy, Harmony, Focus, Rest and Recovery.” And they have really nice terpene profiles, but they also have effects which a lot of people don’t put effects in their cartridges, put effects back into it to give you those terpenes and an effect in a vape cartridge.

Tim Pickett:
This is your thing, right, is that you have the effects that you’re essentially just putting it right out there. This is what you would feel.

Beckie Meisenheimer:
Yes.

Tim Pickett:
Some of the effects that you are probably going to feel the harmony and the Harmony… Ooh, I’m excited to try that.

Beckie Meisenheimer:
I love Harmony, it’s my favorite. It really is. I mean for me, I can take just a small amount, one inhale at night and I can sleep all night and get up rested. And that’s huge for somebody with back problems that they don’t toss and turn and move, and you really get a good night’s sleep and it doesn’t cause anything strange. And I just love it. And that’s why we created it. It was a lot for myself.

Tim Pickett:
Yeah.

Beckie Meisenheimer:
And then we wanted to help others to see that there’s an alternative and everybody’s, body’s different. So they really have to tune in to what works for them. My husband, when he tries Harmony, he doesn’t like the effect. It riles his brain and the receptors. And he doesn’t like that very much, but it puts me right to sleep. So that’s why we created the other line too. We also have some that is for people that do like the way dirt smells in cannabis.

Tim Pickett:
It’s the plant smell. We have a [inaudible 00:25:39] one too.

Beckie Meisenheimer:
Yeah. And I don’t like the smell of those, but a lot of people do. So we created something for them. It’s not my favorite.

Tim Pickett:
It’s refreshing to hear the truth, right? Because a lot of people are like, “Ah, do I have to eat skunks and dirt?”

Beckie Meisenheimer:
Yeah. It’s not that way at all. When I first went to Curaleaf, I walked in there and it smelled terrible and I was freaked out by all the names and I didn’t know what they did or why. So that’s when I started investigating and saying demographics in my age, which is middle-aged, if I could create something that people like me could walk in there and go, “Oh, this is a brand that has one for harmony. I know what harmony means,” instead of Dosi Doe or the skunk or all those things.

Tim Pickett:
This is why I like 4/20 because it brings us all together.

Beckie Meisenheimer:
Absolutely.

Bruce Meisenheimer:
Bruce Meisenheimer with Pure Plan Medical.

Tim Pickett:
So I see you got the sticker, “Cannabis is medicine.”

Bruce Meisenheimer:
Yes. Yes, and we believe in that since Beckie’s had a hard time with her back over the years and we needed to find something else for her other than opiates. And this has been helping her out a lot, being able to get restful sleep.

Narith Panh:
I’d love to invite Megan up onto the stage here, share a few words, talk to you guys a little bit about the UPC and really what they’re here to do for our community. So here’s Megan.

Megan Keller:
I’m so pleased to be here celebrating the medicine that has improved so many of our lives. Today, I want to tell you how our subsidy program changes lives and how Dragonfly has spearheaded the effort by taking on more patrons than all the other medical cannabis pharmacies combined.

Tim Pickett:
So now, we’re hearing from the Utah Patients Coalition representative because Desiree Hennessy, there was an announcement made that Desiree Hennessy has lost her son. So very sad to hear that. Des is just a hell of an activist for medical cannabis here in Utah, has done so much for the program and for access for so many people in Utah. Condolences definitely to her and her family. The Dragonfly subsidy has put a lot of people through for product, for free product every month. That’s run through the Utah Patients Coalition and multiple pharmacies are part of that. Dragonfly obviously here announced that they’ve supplied a little bit more than everybody else certainly and they’ve done a lot for the community for sure.

Narith Panh:
So we’re really proud to be able to invite our next keynote speaker up here, his name’s Cliff Uckerman from Utah Therapeutic Health Center. And he’s doing a lot of incredible work around mental health and really helping to destigmatize mental health and having real conversations with people and taking away the shame from that. So I’m really proud to bring Cliff up here and he’s going to talk to you guys a little bit about the work that he is doing.

Clifton Uckerman:
Thank you. Thank you. Narith, thank you so much. All right. So let me get everybody’s attention around here. When I say four, let me hear you say 20. Four.

Audience:
20.

Clifton Uckerman:
Four.

Audience:
20.

Clifton Uckerman:
So my name’s Clif Uckerman. I also want us to give a little bit more love and support to our young artists that were up here rapping, let’s give them a round of applause. You guys did a great job. I know I have to stop at 4:20 so that we can take a moment of silence. So will you just let me know, okay? I want to talk about the shame molecule. I want to coin that term right here on stage today. If you Google that term, you will not find it. It comes from me. And I want to make sure that you all can maybe see me in the future as a pioneer in the medical cannabis industry for bringing behavioral help to this community and to this industry in an affirmative, non-punitive, shame-free kind of way. I want to give a shout out to Tim Pickett with UTTHC for letting me do this work with him.

Clifton Uckerman:
So the shame molecule is a big part of PTSD. PTSD is the only qualifying condition for the Utah Medical Cannabis Program. And that shame molecule gets stuck and locked into the trauma memory. That trauma memory is that negative life event that we all have had in some form or another that gets imprinted into the hinder mid part of the brain. Now, one cool thing is that we’re all gathered around here, circling around, dancing around, singing around plant-based medicine, marijuana, cannabis to be exact. And also, I think all of us share something in common which is the traumatic impact of the drug war, the war on drugs that started way back in the sixties and seventies. So the shame molecule that’s trapped into that trauma memory, that negative life event not just in our lives, but probably your dad’s life, your grandma’s life, your great aunt’s life, where they told us that we were bad people, there was something wrong with this.

Clifton Uckerman:
We were doing something wrong. They locked us up. They criminalized us. And for generations, for a minute now, we’re still trying to recover from that. And we’ve been down on our luck, got really hard hit because we could never talk about it. We had to live in silence. We had to have a relationship with medical cannabis in a very criminal way. And then we were thought of as criminals for a long time and we’re recovering from that. So I want to talk to you a little bit about how we’re helping people treat PTSD with any other negative life event, with any other trauma memory that the shame molecule’s packed into, where they come in feeling like they’re to blame, they’re a bad person. They did something wrong, there’s something wrong with them. They get socially ridiculed, socially condemned, socially marginalized, really beaten up and bullied, made to believe that because they’re a bad person, they’re not going to go to heaven and they’re only going to go to hell.

Clifton Uckerman:
So we bring them in. We use medical cannabis in conjunction with the PTSD treatment. We know that CBD, high ratios of CBD with a little bit of THC is what our patients love. They don’t want to come in to get high, they want to come in to heal. So what they do is they dose before session, they dose after session and it helps reduce the inflammation, all that negative life experience, all that trauma, all that bullying, all that social condemnation, all that social ridicule, turns into mental stress, emotional psychological trauma, it inflames the brain. So we help them decompress. We get them out. Call to action is Dragonfly has a product that they just put out today on Facebook, it’s the sleep stuff. That’s going to be a really important after session dosing strategy. I want you to take a look at that, let us know what we can do to help. Thank you so much for letting me come up here and be on stage with you.

Tim Pickett:
Stay safe out there.

By UtahMarijuana.org
Published April 29, 2022
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(801) 851-5554hello@utthc.com
Address:
740 E 3900 S
Suite 108
Salt Lake City, UT 84107
press@utthc.com
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