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What to Expect in This Episode

Episode 60 of Utah in the Weeds is quite a bit different in that it was recorded live at WB’s eatery in Ogden, Utah. It was sponsored by Salt Baked City and hosted by WB’s, a relatively new restaurant that opened in late 2019 [02:05], just months before the start of the coronavirus pandemic.

WB’s is unique in a couple of ways. [03:09] First, they feature dry cocktails for people who don’t consume alcohol. Second, the place is cannabis friendly. During the podcast, they handed out cannabis-themed coasters to designate who was drinking dry cocktails as opposed to those consuming alcohol.

The restaurant offers a limited number of CBD products alongside the food. [04:07] They are working on a beverage line, too. And if you are interested in a scratch-and-sniff book to help you familiarize yourself with different cannabis strains, WB’s has one for sale. [13:51]

Early in the broadcast Tim briefly discussed the fact that older people are more likely to use THC and alcohol together. [08:48] He recommended against that, saying it’s not a wise idea. The thought came up because of WB’s dry cocktails. Tim wanted to remind guests to go dry if they were using THC.

Chris asked WB’s owner Vivi Wanderley-Britt if she and her wife had plans to make their other two restaurants cannabis-friendly. [11:40] At the moment, they do not. They want to keep the cannabis thing with WB’s for the time being. Should they open other WB’s locations, these would also be cannabis-friendly.

This particular podcast is truly unique. Tim and Chris talked with Wanderley-Britt about so many things that we can’t cover it all in a summary. If you are interested in the concept of a cannabis-friendly restaurant, this episode is for you. And if you’re in Ogden, check out WB’s.

Resources in This Episode

Podcast Transcript

Chris Holifield:

All right, for those of you that can hear, they’re going to enjoy the podcast recording. For those of you that can’t, it is what it is. You can go and download the episode at a later date at Utah in the Weeds, any podcast app you can find it in. Anyway, we should get going. This is going to be a live recording at WB’s Eatery here in Ogden. Thank you to WB’s for letting us record. Thank you to Cole with Salt Baked City for putting on this event, and WB’s for hosting it.

Tim Pickett:

Yeah, absolutely. We want to introduce the owner of WB’s right away. And there’s a little housekeeping that she needs to do. And it’s just great that you’ve asked everybody to be here. This is really exciting. [Vivi 00:00:48] from WB’s Eatery.

Vivi Wanderley-Britt:

Hi, everyone, welcome. Thank you for coming. Just some housekeeping, when you checked in, you were given coasters. For those of you who have the sativa coaster, it means that you drink drinks with alcohol, you cannot walk around the restaurant. We are a restaurant and not a bar, so you have to stay seated. If you have the indica coaster, it means you’re drinking a dry cocktail, which means that you can walk around with your drink. But if you drink alcohol, if you have a glass of wine, you cannot walk around. So please just stay seated. And you are welcome to buy more drinks if you’d like, we pair the three cocktails with the bites. And we’ll have our staff walking around. So just flag one of us and let us know how we can better serve you. And thank you for being here. We’re excited.

Chris Holifield:

I’m excited, thank you.

Tim Pickett:

Yeah, this is pretty exciting.

Chris Holifield:

Yeah, no, this is a great location. Can we start talking with you here? I want to find out about WB’s.

Vivi Wanderley-Britt:

We can.

Chris Holifield:

Yeah, let’s do this. Tell us about WB’s, how long have you been here?

Vivi Wanderley-Britt:

WB’s, we opened up WB’s in November of 2019, right before the pandemic. We work with Thane who is the owner of the Monarch. And he approached Amy, my wife, because we own Pig and a Jelly Jar. We have three locations. One of them is on 25th Street, and he wanted her to have a restaurant here and be the flagship for the building. So WB’s was concepted on a rainy day. It started with a sandwich concept, and then it quickly evolved. We were like, well, it needs to be more than just sandwiches. I’m from Brazil, so you will notice that there’s some Latin flavor on the menu. The menu is also inspired by our travels to [Tulum 00:02:56] and Europe. We wanted a place that is laid back, that you can come in and work in the morning, you can have a latte, just hang out here and come back at night to have cocktails.

Vivi Wanderley-Britt:

We have focused on non-alcoholic cocktails, Amy and I don’t drink anymore. And we think that you can have fun having dry cocktail. So we had a mixologist actually, develop and come up with our dry cocktails. And WB’s is also a cannabis concept, is a cannabis lifestyle brand. So WB’s can be Wanderley-Britt, which is our last name, or Weed and Bites. So it can go either way. But it’s cannabis-friendly, we welcome everybody. We’re excited that cannabis medically is legal here. And when recreational becomes legal, then we’ll probably put more emphasis on the Weed and Bites, because that’s what the concept’s all about.

Chris Holifield:

And are you putting some CBD and some hemp in some of your products now that are being sold here?

Vivi Wanderley-Britt:

Yes. So we work with a company out of Denver, and they make our CBD. It’s 1500 milligrams and it’s fantastic. So we white label the CBD. I started taking CBD because I have herniated discs. And I don’t like taking medication, so I decided to give it a try. And it really helped me. And it helped our dogs because we have older dogs, and they have arthritis. So it helped the dogs with the pain and anxiety too. And because WB’s is a cannabis lifestyle brand, Amy said why not have a white label CBD? So we even have an LLC for a beverage line. We’re hoping to get into that and have a CBD beverage line was in the next 12 months.

Chris Holifield:

Are you working on that right now? Or are you…

Vivi Wanderley-Britt:

No, we’re looking for partners, so if anyone out there… We talked a little bit quickly with Beverly from Jilu when she was here. And because now the industry is growing here, if there’s anyone out there that is willing to go into this adventure with us, let’s chat.

Tim Pickett:

So right now Vivi, they’re serving, just to explain to the listeners where we’re at. We’re in this great corner space in Ogden, the sun shining on the patio outside, there’s people outside on the patio. There’s people inside big open space. This is just a beautiful, it’s a really beautiful space. There’s a coffee bar up front, you can order coffee in the morning, I guess at any time. I had lunch here and I had some tostadas with Brussels sprouts, that were phenomenal. And you can have a beer with lunch and come here at night and have cocktails, or have beer, as a restaurant. You’re not a wine bar.

Vivi Wanderley-Britt:

No, we’re not a wine bar.

Tim Pickett:

But right now, so this event tonight, this Weed Social is a multi-course tasting menu paired with some cocktails dry or not dry. What are we seeing now that’s served first?

Vivi Wanderley-Britt:

You’re seeing a salad course. We have… well, not a course, five bites. So the first one is a salad. And I cannot remember the name of the cocktail, but I think you have it here. The salad is fantastic. It is a spring salad with lemon basil vinaigrette. And it pairs with a pineapple paradise. So I believe that that’s what they’re having right now. I would say watch out for the Acapulco smoke, because they smoke the drink. It’s pretty cool.

Tim Pickett:

They smoke the drink in front of you?

Vivi Wanderley-Britt:

Yeah, when they serve you the drink, it has smoke coming out of it. So they’re prepping now.

Tim Pickett:

Oh, I see. Almost like a cover, a glass cover goes over the drink?

Vivi Wanderley-Britt:

Yes, we have a smoker.

Tim Pickett:

And you have a smoker that smokes the drink?

Vivi Wanderley-Britt:

That smokes the drink.

Tim Pickett:

That’s pretty awesome.

Vivi Wanderley-Britt:

Yeah. So [Vinnie 00:07:15] one of our bartenders came up with that.

Tim Pickett:

And you can choose either sativa or indica drink.

Vivi Wanderley-Britt:

Yeah.

Tim Pickett:

One is alcoholic and one is dry-

Vivi Wanderley-Britt:

The other is not alcoholic. Yeah, we thought it would be nice to play off of the cannabis, because we are a lifestyle. And you can also take it home, because it’s cute. On the one side of the coaster, you have the Cocktail and Cannabis Club presents with Social, and Cole from Salt Baked City hosts the event. He has been a great partner and our actually gateway to the community.

Tim Pickett:

Right, yeah. Shout out to Cole. Right down there. Thanks, Cole. And you’re the one who got us involved in this, too. Salt Baked City, which had their first publication two months ago?

Cole Fullmer:

Three.

Tim Pickett:

Three months ago. If you haven’t seen it, there are maybe four or five copies that haven’t been given out throughout the Valley. You can search for them and read all about the insiders, essentially, in the cannabis space. Does a really good job of keeping the community informed. It’s great to be out again.

Chris Holifield:

Yeah, no this is great.

Tim Pickett:

This is the first event we’ve done, Chris.

Chris Holifield:

Oh, yeah.

Tim Pickett:

It’s really exciting. I wanted to make a comment about the alcoholic versus non-alcoholic drinks. I think it really fits well with the idea of a cannabis lifestyle, because I don’t know if you guys out there know this, but if you’re over 40, you’re more likely to use alcohol and THC at the same time, which is not very safe. It’s not a very safe practice. But us over 40 people, we tend to do it more. The younger crowd tends not to do that. They tend not to mix. It’s either one or the other. And tonight, the idea is, look, if you’re going to be using THC as part of your lifestyle, then non-alcoholic drinks are going to be a better choice.

Vivi Wanderley-Britt:

Yes. And they’re great non-alcoholic drinks. Honestly, we have some non-distilled spirits that if you smell the bottle of the killer whiskey, you would think that there’s alcohol and there’s none. So you can still enjoy. You can still enjoy a great cocktail, a dry cocktail. The taste is there, but just not the alcohol. And yes, we don’t think mixing THC with alcohol is a good thing. And I come from the marketing background and we’ve seen research that the younger generation, they are choosing THC and not alcohol. So you have that trend ahead already started. I mean, we hope that it will be legal recreational here, and when we get to that point, then we would switch to allow people to consume and have only dry cocktails. Which is what they have in Europe.

Vivi Wanderley-Britt:

Amy and I went to Amsterdam, and we went to a café. We didn’t know what to expect, and we’re like, there was no alcohol. It was pretty cool, because you could choose your strain. And I don’t smoke. Amy has a medical card and it helps her tremendously. I get paranoid, it does not work for me. And I think it’s because I’m already calm. I love CBD. But I ate half of a brownie. I slept the entire time from Amsterdam all the way back to Belgium.

Tim Pickett:

I’m jealous.

Vivi Wanderley-Britt:

But it was cool. And that’s what we want to do here. When it becomes legal, we want to turn this into a weed and bites place.

Tim Pickett:

I haven’t seen this type of restaurant and this type of place anywhere, where you can have coffee in the morning and cocktails at night. This doesn’t really exist here at least in Utah, I don’t know if it exists in the US. But are there other places that you can do this? Or is Ogden unique?

Vivi Wanderley-Britt:

I think we’re unique. We haven’t seen this in many places. I think you can find this concept more in LA, in the bigger cities, but not so much here. So WB’s was inspired by our travels, Europe, Tulum, but also LA. Amy and I love traveling and we love seeing what other people are doing. And we wanted to bring something here. We love Ogden. Ogden is amazing. Look at this, in what better place you have a cannabis concept.

Chris Holifield:

You mentioned you have a couple restaurants in Salt Lake, or one restaurant in Salt Lake, Pig and a Jelly Jar.

Vivi Wanderley-Britt:

Pig and a Jelly Jar, yeah.

Chris Holifield:

Have you thought about trying to make it more cannabis-friendly, kind of like how you’re doing this one, or doing something similar to this one in Salt Lake? Or are you kind of keeping this an Ogden special.

Vivi Wanderley-Britt:

We wanted to keep this is Ogden and WB’s specifically. If we were to open a WB’s location in Salt Lake, then we would bring that. But it just fits with the brand. Pig is more southern comfort food.

Chris Holifield:

Oh, it’s great, great location. Love it.

Vivi Wanderley-Britt:

Yeah, it’s amazing, it’s fun. I’m sure it would fit well, but I think it’s more of a signature of WB’s Eatery, because we have a white label CBD. And we have we have bong vases here for sale that, it’s the bud vase. And they look beautiful. It looks like a piece of the core, but it’s actually a bong.

Chris Holifield:

I didn’t even see that. I’ll have to look around for this.

Vivi Wanderley-Britt:

We have them for sale throughout the restaurant, I’ll grab a few. But we have a stash box. So if you look through our market, you will see that we have a little bit of cannabis-related products. We have stash boxes that we have, we have trays. We just want to help the community. We believe in cannabis and we’re excited that it’s here. And I know that it has helped Amy a lot and it helps a lot of other people. So we think it’s important and we just want to embrace it. And that’s why we brought the community together. This is an education and alliance night.

Chris Holifield:

And you do these once a month, the Weed Social?

Vivi Wanderley-Britt:

Once a month.

Chris Holifield:

Once a month, okay.

Vivi Wanderley-Britt:

Yeah, it’s the third…

Tim Pickett:

Third Wednesday-

Vivi Wanderley-Britt:

Is this the third or the last Wednesday of the month?

Tim Pickett:

That’s a great-

Vivi Wanderley-Britt:

I’m lost, it’s the last-

Tim Pickett:

I think it’s the third Wednesday or is it the last Wednesday of the month?

Chris Holifield:

Follow you on social media and I’m sure they can-

Tim Pickett:

And ooh, I can smell the smoke-

Vivi Wanderley-Britt:

Can you smell the smoke-

Tim Pickett:

From the Acapulco smoke. Now, that is not, let’s just be clear, that is not weed down there they’re burning.

Chris Holifield:

I like how you have to make that kind of like known like, you better let people know.

Tim Pickett:

Yeah, I’ve got to make that known. Well I would say, oh, I see a guy down there with a lighter and a smoker. That is not cannabis.

Vivi Wanderley-Britt:

No, those are chips that we have properly for food.

Tim Pickett:

I think, at this point, I’d know the difference in smell.

Vivi Wanderley-Britt:

We have a book. I don’t know if we sold all of them, but there’s a book that is Scratch and Sniff, and it’s all about cannabis.

Tim Pickett:

Oh, really?

Vivi Wanderley-Britt:

It has different strains… Yeah, Amy buys everything that you see here. She’s a fantastic buyer and she has so much fun buying it. But one of them, we were just like scratching, we’re like, smell this one. It’s pretty fun if you just go through the book. I’ll see if I can find one and I’ll let you take a look at it-

Chris Holifield:

A Scratch and Sniff cannabis book, I love that. Anything else we want to ask her while we have her up here, Tim?

Tim Pickett:

I mean, I think everybody should come up here to WB’s, whether you’re here tonight or not. WB’s Eatery in Ogden, the address is 455 25th Street. You need to make the trip up here.

Chris Holifield:

Oh, it’s worth it, it’s worth it.

Vivi Wanderley-Britt:

No, thank you. We love it here. We welcome everyone. The first Sunday of each month, we have a drag brunch, which is Wigs and Brunch. And then the third Friday of the month, we have a jazz band. And then the last Wednesday of the month we have Weed Social, so come up here. We have wine on tap, we have a market with drinks, we have lattes, we have amazing dry cocktails and alcoholic cocktails, amazing food. So yeah, come on and hash out with your best buds.

Chris Holifield:

How far away is the nearest pharmacy, the nearest cannabis pharmacy?

Tim Pickett:

Now, from here-

Chris Holifield:

Yeah, I’m just curious.

Tim Pickett:

Somebody down there will know. How far away is Perfect Earth from here, that’s the closest pharmacy?

Speaker 5:

Two or three miles [inaudible 00:15:20]-

Tim Pickett:

Two, three miles south-

Chris Holifield:

So not far. So come up to Perfect Earth-

Tim Pickett:

Couple of patients down there shouting out, two or three miles south.

Chris Holifield:

Yeah, go there and then come here and get some coffee or…

Tim Pickett:

Get some dry cocktails after you’ve visited the pharmacy.

Chris Holifield:

Love it.

Vivi Wanderley-Britt:

Yes.

Tim Pickett:

Or you can go north and see Mindy up in Brigham city, that would be the next one up north. Thank you so much for having us out here. I think we’ll take a little-

Chris Holifield:

Yeah, take a little break-

Tim Pickett:

… take a little break-

Chris Holifield:

… and chat with somebody else next here.

Tim Pickett:

Yeah.

Chris Holifield:

Awesome.

Vivi Wanderley-Britt:

Cool, thank you.

Chris Holifield:

So Cole, come on. Get up close to that microphone there, buddy. Let’s chat. Let someone talk to you about this event.

Cole Fullmer:

Well, here I am.

Chris Holifield:

Bring that up, with how loud the background, I want that just kind of close so you’ll feel like you’re talking to me.

Cole Fullmer:

I need it right on my face.

Chris Holifield:

Yeah, right there, right there. So Cole, the guy behind salt lake’s, or, salt lakes, Salt Baked-

Cole Fullmer:

B-A-K-E-D, yes, pun intended, right?

Chris Holifield:

Yeah. So how long ago did you start this Weed Social? Because this is kind of an event you started, right?

Cole Fullmer:

You know, this is our second one.

Chris Holifield:

Okay, for some reason I thought you’ve been doing it for a while.

Cole Fullmer:

Our first Weed Social was on 4/20 last month. It’s been a work-in-progress. This has been a great thing though. The main idea behind it is getting the cannabis industry and those involved together under one roof. We had this program start last year. And unfortunately, a month later COVID happened. And everybody’s been busy working, getting their various pharmacies, grows, clinics, what have you, started. But we haven’t been together. So now that the world’s turning back on, this is a great opportunity for us to get to know each other, frankly.

Chris Holifield:

Is that kind of what you’re hoping from it, it’s just a giant networking event really. Just kind of a way for people to just, no really other agenda, just to get to know each other and hang out?

Cole Fullmer:

Yep, just break bread, have drinks and talk about the green future. We were doing this, I met Tim at the Access Salt Lake meetings that we were doing monthly with the City Weekly-

Tim Pickett:

Remember those meetings we also had at, we did those Access meetings and then there was a hemp group-

Cole Fullmer:

Right, down in the…

Tim Pickett:

The Max, the club-

Cole Fullmer:

Right yeah, at the barber shop, club. Yeah, we had one of those, I think and then bam, COVID hit. Again with our program, we started up March. First dispensary, Dragonfly Wellness, opened March 2nd. I can’t think of how many weeks after that we were put into quarantine, I think four weeks.

Chris Holifield:

Pretty quickly, pretty quickly-

Tim Pickett:

I want to say it was about the 17th of my calendar-

Cole Fullmer:

Weed was deemed essential though, in the state. So we have that going for us. But again, with the program started, we’re a small group. The cannabis industry in Utah is tiny, and I love that. Luxury that I’ve gotten with Salt Baked City is getting to meet everybody in the industry. Whether they’re growers, pharmacy operators, bud tenders, you name it. And without being far-fetched, it’s probably been the joy in my life. Lifetime friends all in this past year, when I shouldn’t have been making friends, during COVID.

Chris Holifield:

You should have been stuck in your house, Cole.

Cole Fullmer:

I should have been and I was, but I was interviewing people like you guys were doing over Zoom and whatever we could do over the phone. Getting on certain field trips that we could to the grows to keep bringing the news, because although the world was turned off, it didn’t mean that the news was done with the cannabis industry. And it was our first year, so there was a lot to report. A lot of grand openings, a lot of new jobs popping up. And what’s not so funny to me is you watch local news now and nobody’s talking about the 3500 some odd jobs that medical cannabis created in Utah this past year, when everybody was laying other people off.

Chris Holifield:

That’s awesome.

Cole Fullmer:

We’re not only helping people, but now we’re helping the state in a time of need. So medical cannabis saves the day, right?

Chris Holifield:

You have another magazine coming out here like in a month or so, or two months or how soon here?

Cole Fullmer:

Actually, very soon. My team and I, we’re, only half of us are here tonight, because the other half are working. We’re building the magazine this week. We should be done probably tomorrow, Friday. So we’re aiming for a distribution at the beginning of June. So our second magazine-

Chris Holifield:

I’ll keep an eye out for that, yeah-

Cole Fullmer:

… Again, we’re a quarterly, so we’re popping out every three months. We do have some special things in the works for June in July. We have a lot of grand openings. Bloc Pharmacy is opening Friday, this Friday the 28th in South Jordan.

Chris Holifield:

[crosstalk 00:20:14] this episode launch, that was up, it’ll be up this Friday-

Tim Pickett:

That’s right. It will be open, and that’s on 103rd South, just west of I-15. You get off the 106th South exit, go west, take a right, right along that frontage road in the business complex. And it’s right there, about 103rd South.

Chris Holifield:

Well, that’s a great location, I’m going to have to check that out. Bloc you said?

Tim Pickett:

Bloc Pharmacy. Also, they have a pharmacy in St. George, that will be opening soon.

Cole Fullmer:

Next week, I believe.

Tim Pickett:

And I was down in Cedar City and St. George over the past few days, talking with Bloom Medicinal as well. They’re working really hard down there to open hopefully by June 1st, on Tuesday, down there in Cedar. So that will give us, Chris, the entire gamut of 14 medical cannabis pharmacies in Utah, they’ll all be open.

Chris Holifield:

I’m eager to see if they’ll actually be able to supply all the patients, like they say they will be. Once all the growers, once all the pharmacies-

Cole Fullmer:

Not right now, our last field trip at Wasatch Extraction, we were talking with the owner, Steve, Fruit of Life.

Chris Holifield:

Yeah.

Cole Fullmer:

These processors are fighting to get 30, 40 pounds a month, when in reality they need 400 in order to do the work that they want to do, operate as a medical cannabis company as they’d like to. The program gets a lot of, I’m trying to think of the right words, the program gets beat up, because we don’t have the products out right now. But in my mind’s eye, from the media’s point of view, we have the perfect problem. We have far more demand than we have supply, because people are actually signing up for this program. We’re about to reach 30,000 patients. It’s only been the first year, the state was calling that we’d have maybe 10,000 at this point, when they were laughing at us about medical cannabis. Now, that St. George, Cedar City are opening up, we expect these numbers to double in the next year.

Chris Holifield:

And once all those college students come back.

Cole Fullmer:

Yeah, right?

Tim Pickett:

Right? Down in Cedar city and Dixie, and life opening back up to events and people talking about this more. I mean, we find in the clinics that COVID has kept information quarantined as well.

Cole Fullmer:

It has.

Chris Holifield:

What do you mean by that? Information-

Tim Pickett:

Because I think we tend to read information that we already know about, we already like. Social media feeds us what we’re already used to. And so now that things are opening up, I think that the word will get out even more.

Chris Holifield:

Because we’ll be able to have events like this, versus just what’s on Facebook, just what they’re pumping out in front of you. Because of that algorithm.

Cole Fullmer:

And they’re just people even driving by right now on 25th Street, looking at our green cross on the window there. And the reason they’re looking is because they don’t think it’s supposed to be there. Why the magazine gets a lot of eyes on it, is because a lot of people don’t think it’s supposed to be there.

Chris Holifield:

Oh, they’re talking about weed-

Cole Fullmer:

20% of our population right now in Utah, and this is my guestimation, doesn’t know that medical cannabis is legal. So it’s my job and your guys’ job to let the public know. Unfortunately, local media isn’t doing that. You guys will probably agree, we get to see the same 10, 15 minute or second splurts on there maybe every other month.

Tim Pickett:

Right, they put out an article when a pharmacy opens. That might be a news story for half a day and then it’s gone.

Cole Fullmer:

Yeah, not even with every pharmacy. I remember Perfect Earth up here was on Fox 13, Channel 4, KSL. Not long after that, Wholesome Co opened and crickets. Nobody from the local media showed up except from Salt Baked City. And it makes me kind of wonder why.

Chris Holifield:

Well, why do you think it is?

Cole Fullmer:

Because it doesn’t sell, for them.

Chris Holifield:

You don’t think so, no?

Cole Fullmer:

No, it does for me. And it seems clear for people like you and I that it does, but…

Tim Pickett:

But we are still a small segment of the marketplace.

Cole Fullmer:

There’s a reason why City Weekly hasn’t started a weed magazine. And frankly, they’ve been ingrained into the community for over two decades, three decades. And frankly, they would lose more than they would gain by the amount of people they would piss off supporting cannabis. My job is breaking the stigma. Cannabis still isn’t popular in Utah. We’re having events like this, but don’t get me wrong, it’s not popular in Utah with the general public, if you look at everybody collectively. So that’s my job through the education, news, breaking the stigma to make patients that are showing up here tonight feel comfortable to go out into the rest of the world and talk about what they do.

Chris Holifield:

Over the last year of doing Salt Baked City, have you seen that stigma crumble? Have you seen that wall kind of coming down? A lot over even just last year?

Cole Fullmer:

That’s a great question. I’d like to think that I have. But it’s still early. We’re early in our first year. But what’s encouraging for me is, I don’t have to explain what Salt Baked City is anymore. Or not as often.

Chris Holifield:

Sure.

Cole Fullmer:

People have heard of us, they’re following us. So that means we’re doing something right, we’re feeding the news to an audience now. The stigma will change, it will in the next year or so. But again, that’s going to be up to us. The reason I started Salt Baked City, is because nobody was doing it, and it needed to be done. And it’s why you guys started the podcast. And same with your clinic. And I don’t want to sound like a pioneer, but we kind of are.

Tim Pickett:

Absolutely.

Cole Fullmer:

Somebody’s got to do it, right?

Tim Pickett:

I think it’s hard. We’ve talked to a lot of people, we’ve even talked to JD Lauritzen, who I see down there. And we’ve talked to Mindy Madeo, as well, people that we see here. This community, really, it was scary in the beginning to go out in the middle of the road and say, hey, I’m for medical cannabis. I’m going to help you find out more about this, about the program. That’s a scary thing in a state like Utah. So I get it.

Cole Fullmer:

You had to kind of say this stuff under your breath, with a hush, when you were talking about cannabis. It’s still weird to say cannabis and Utah in the same sentence.

Chris Holifield:

I think I’d even talked about this on the podcast, back in the day, if you wore a shirt with a pot leaf, it’s like…

Tim Pickett:

Yeah, [crosstalk 00:27:12] that’s right-

Chris Holifield:

… worried the police were going to get me, or something. And look at you, Tim, I mean, you’ve got a marijuana leaf right there on your shirt.

Tim Pickett:

Yeah, I’ve got the Utahmarijuana.org T-shirt on-

Chris Holifield:

And are you nervous to wear that?

Tim Pickett:

Not at all. In fact, I think I went to a school, I kind of accidentally wore my marijuana mask to one of the school events that I went to. And my son reminded me afterwards, “Dad, I thought you were supposed to turn that inside out?”

Chris Holifield:

It’s a pretty discreet mask though.

Tim Pickett:

I feel like it is, but apparently it’s not, if you’re not somebody who’s in our community.

Chris Holifield:

Well, that’s my question for you. I’m not put in the position that you are Tim, I don’t have kids. But I think in the future, right now, you’ve got kids that are all…

Tim Pickett:

12 and 15. So I have a 15-year-old daughter and a 12-year-old son.

Chris Holifield:

Does the 12-year-old daughter not get invited to certain birthday parties because of what you do?

Tim Pickett:

No, as a matter of fact, in the beginning, my kids don’t go out and say what I do. It’s not public knowledge. But my daughter came home a couple of months ago and said, “Well, Dad, the word’s out. My friends know what you do.”

Chris Holifield:

My dad’s a pot doctor.

Tim Pickett:

And it was okay. My daughter explains it like, I take care of people who need medical marijuana as medicine.

Chris Holifield:

And I love that.

Tim Pickett:

I take care of people, just like I did before-

Chris Holifield:

But that’s what you do, it’s a beautiful thing.

Tim Pickett:

And that’s what the program is about. It’s not about the weed, so much is it’s about people-

Chris Holifield:

The people-

Tim Pickett:

… who need access to something they haven’t had in order to feel better. We talk a lot about the plant, marijuana, weed, ganja, whatever you call it. But it comes down to the person who just wants to feel better. They just want to live a lifestyle that is free, that helps them… yeah. And so that’s, I think, what we’re doing. That’s what makes it easier to wear the mask at the school. And it makes it easier for my kids to explain the Instagram feed. And that’s okay, that’s what I want to do.

Chris Holifield:

I love it.

Cole Fullmer:

That’s encouraging to hear. Because frankly, it’s going to take the youth to push us over, or up to the top.

Chris Holifield:

I guess we need to get on Tik Tok because that’s where the youth is-

Tim Pickett:

I know, that’s where all this happens. Do they suppress Tik Tok for weed, like they do Facebook?

Chris Holifield:

I don’t know-

Cole Fullmer:

They do-

Chris Holifield:

Do they?

Cole Fullmer:

Yeah, cannabis is not, it’s frowned upon on Tik Tok.

Chris Holifield:

Do you have a Tik Tok for Salt Baked on there?

Cole Fullmer:

We do, yeah. That’s why I need kids, so they could show me how to use all the different social media features that Salt Baked City has. But we’re found on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Tik Tok, YouTube. I don’t know.

Tim Pickett:

Yeah, yeah. Well, this is exciting. I’m glad that you’re sponsoring events Cole. We are happy to come out and talk to you every time, because they’re just so fun.

Cole Fullmer:

Oh, I love it.

Tim Pickett:

And things change. Every time we talk to you, it’s something new.

Cole Fullmer:

It’s unbelievable, now that the world’s turning on. And looking at life, how it was before medical cannabis in Utah. But these events are needed. I have friends and they have friends that have been traveling out of state to experience the medicine and the culture that it brings along with it. I’m trying to start these events, so we don’t have to hop in the car and go do it.

Chris Holifield:

And are you looking to do more events like this, like all over in Utah, or just kind of more here?

Cole Fullmer:

Shades Brewery is one of our sponsors as well-

Chris Holifield:

That’s right, you were talking about that, yeah-

Cole Fullmer:

… so they want us to have some parties at their taproom downtown. We have our magazine release party at Good Grammar on June 13th.

Chris Holifield:

Okay.

Cole Fullmer:

God willing, we get the magazine out.

Chris Holifield:

June 13th, okay.

Cole Fullmer:

June 13th. That’s a Sunday and it’s the weekend before Father’s Day weekend, and the weekend after pride weekend. So we should be open for a good time. We’ll be participating in pride, downtown farmer’s market, the Park Silly Market in Park City, trying to become VIP sponsors of Ogden Twilight. And really, the main idea of being out at these events is to let people know sadly, that medical cannabis is legal in the state. But then if they want to find out more, we’re here. And that’s why I want you guys out everywhere we go, because I need the help with the education. We’re just passing out magazines. I need my friends and family with me to make this thing actually work, right?

Chris Holifield:

Exactly. I mean without us, it’s like there’s no you. Without us, there’s no you. How can people find you Cole, online? Just Saltbakedcity.com, I guess you were already mentioned on all the social medias-

Cole Fullmer:

Saltbakedcity.com, Salt Baked City, yeah. It’s easy, nobody claimed the name Salt Baked City. So if you type that in anywhere, you should find us.

Chris Holifield:

Awesome.

Cole Fullmer:

Again, the names catching on. I pushed the boundaries a little bit with Salt Baked City the name, but frankly, I think it was fun. And…

Tim Pickett:

It is fun. And I think the title of what you’re doing makes sense to people. If it turns somebody off in the beginning, it doesn’t take too long for that curiosity to come back. And even though I get it, it’s the same thing as us, utahmarijuana.org. It’s, look, we’re using terms that people aren’t used to hearing, but that’s okay.

Cole Fullmer:

It is, it’s the reason why we’re creating the dank dictionary. A lot of people don’t know what cannabinoids are, terpenes, the entourage effect. So a lot like links that you find in online articles, that will take you to another article. This will actually take you to the dictionary. So you’ll see some of our words highlighted in our online work. And that’s mostly to help educate. We have a new language that… well, not new for maybe us, but for majority of Utah, it’s a bunch of new words. And they’re all pretty dank.

Chris Holifield:

Always good to chat with you, Cole.

Cole Fullmer:

Yeah.

Chris Holifield:

Anything else you want to ask him while we have him up here?

Tim Pickett:

No, thanks again, Cole.

Chris Holifield:

Yeah, we’ll let you get back-

Cole Fullmer:

No, this has been a fun charity-

Chris Holifield:

… to your bites.

Cole Fullmer:

And get back to the party, man.

Tim Pickett:

Yeah, it looks like right now they’re serving the prosciutto wrapped asparagus. Is that what we’re getting next?

Cole Fullmer:

I’m getting one of those non-alcoholic Margaritas.

Tim Pickett:

Oh, you are?

Cole Fullmer:

That’s what I’m going to get. I really like the concept that they’re doing here with the non-alcoholic drinks.

Tim Pickett:

Yeah, I had that Acapulco Smoke.

Cole Fullmer:

How was it?

Tim Pickett:

It was really good. And it has, Vivi was describing it. I described it as having a little bit of a bite, like an alcoholic drink. I expect that bite, that alcohol bite to it. And it still had that bite. And she described it as depth.

Cole Fullmer:

I spoke about it briefly in my editorial, in our first issue. I don’t drink anymore, and I haven’t for seven years, for good reason. Just another reason how cannabis has saved my life. Amy and Vivi here at WB eatery turned me on to the zero proof alcohol. And so now when you walk into my house, I have all these various alcohols that are not alcohols. But the kicker is next to them, I have the various tinctures for the cannabinoids. So you have CBD, CBG Delta 8, Delta 9, THC. Next to that is the cannabis-derived terpenes. So if you come over to my house, you don’t have a whiskey sour, you have a whiskey sour diesel. And you can drive home afterwards too, maybe. Maybe, depending on the milligrams.

Tim Pickett:

Boom, okay, you just blew my mind, Cole. A whisky sour diesel-

Cole Fullmer:

Yeah, a real proper paunch.

Tim Pickett:

A real… well, yes.

Chris Holifield:

Are people doing this? Is there bars that are doing… I mean, this is a great idea.

Cole Fullmer:

It’s a tough thing right now. I was in Vegas last week, I think. Yeah, last week, hanging out at our buddy’s restaurant Wing King. Yeah, it’s the first CBD-infused restaurant, pretty much anywhere. They might be doing it a little bit in California, but we need to pull JD Lauritzen up here for this conversation, because I don’t really know. But the trick on having open consumption-

Tim Pickett:

No, he’s given us the, you cannot consume cannabis in public at all. As a matter of fact, he’s going to nod his head at this next statement, unless it is, I think it is stated as a terminally emergent event, like you’ve got to be dying.

Cole Fullmer:

It does, but you know-

Tim Pickett:

Emergency medical condition, he screams up at me.

Chris Holifield:

To be able to consume in-person.

Tim Pickett:

I love that guy.

Cole Fullmer:

I’m having one right now.

Tim Pickett:

To consume it in public. Yeah, we’ve got a lot of work to do with the statute, before we get to-

Cole Fullmer:

Yeah, but you’ll notice why I don’t go too far without JD Lauritzen with me.

Tim Pickett:

No, of course, nobody does. Nobody in this industry goes very far without that guy.

Cole Fullmer:

The doctor would agree, every good writer needs a good lawyer. And JD, he’s a great guy to have around. Not only for the legal advice, but he’s a great friend too.

Tim Pickett:

Yeah.

Chris Holifield:

Absolutely.

Tim Pickett:

And look for, he had an article in the first-

Cole Fullmer:

He does, and he has another one coming out in the next issue. Beginning of the month, he’s breaking down all the legislative updates that we’ve had for the medical cannabis program, talking about the 15th pharmacy. Again, we’ve had so much happen on Capitol Hill, it’s hard for even me to keep up with. That’s why I’ve got to call JD sometimes on the daily, to…

Chris Holifield:

Well, and that’s why it’s important for people to keep up on your magazine and for people to keep up on this podcast. And for people to even come to events like this, to stay up-to-date on what’s going when you’re in Utah-

Tim Pickett:

Exactly right. If you want to know what’s going on in the cannabis space, then you’ve got to get involved. You’ve got to pay attention, because it moves pretty fast.

Cole Fullmer:

It’s the higher content, right?

Tim Pickett:

Yep.

Chris Holifield:

Let’s let Cole go get that drink, though.

Cole Fullmer:

Cool, thanks guys.

Tim Pickett:

Have a good night, Cole.

Chris Holifield:

Thanks buddy.

Chris Holifield:

We’re going to get going here. We’re going to…

Marley Colt:

Hey.

Chris Holifield:

Yeah, it sounds like it’s coming through there. So next, remind me your name again.

Tim Pickett:

Marley.

Chris Holifield:

Marley, that’s right.

Marley Colt:

Marley.

Chris Holifield:

Marley Colt.

Marley Colt:

C-O-L-T-

Tim Pickett:

Marley Colt…

Chris Holifield:

From Kind… well, Kind Buds is what I want to find out about, but she’s…

Tim Pickett:

Yes, and…

Chris Holifield:

Human Nature Medical

Tim Pickett:

Human Nature-

Chris Holifield:

… and Wellness, where she works with Dr. Anden.

Tim Pickett:

Yes, and we’ve talked to Dr. Anden before. And Dr. Anden is kind of a pillar of medical knowledge when it comes to cannabis. Very good physician. Pain is her specialty, primarily. Has had a very successful career in pain and…

Marley Colt:

Sports medicine.

Tim Pickett:

Sports medicine.

Chris Holifield:

Pull that microphone just a little bit closer-

Tim Pickett:

And now has a-

Chris Holifield:

… There we go, [crosstalk 00:38:34] much background noise we have here-

Tim Pickett:

… Definitely one of the first to get into the medical cannabis space. And that has a lot to do with you, I know.

Marley Colt:

Yeah, yeah, it does.

Tim Pickett:

Bring us up to speed on what you guys are doing. But I really want to get into this Kind Buds thing, because it’s awesome.

Marley Colt:

So long story short, Dr. Anden’s been a sports medicine specialist in Ogden for about 32 years. I’ve worked with her for the past 10 years. In March 2019, we started Utah Medical Cannabis Evaluations. She’s always been an advocate for cannabis, me as well. If patients use it, it was don’t ask, don’t tell sort of thing. She already had all of this knowledge before cannabis was medically legalized in Utah. So we were really confident in seeing patients. We knew it wasn’t going to harm them, it only helped them. And we really wanted to be one of the first. So we started that in March 2019. And that’s grown over the last two years, we’ve hired employees, we’ve hired a couple of PAs to help us work with us.

Marley Colt:

In about April, we rebranded to Human Nature, Medical and Wellness. And it’s kind of the first clinic to offer Eastern and Western medicine, modern and holistic options, traditional and alternative options. So we educate on sports medicine, physical medicine and rehab, [inaudible 00:40:06] heal after an injury. But we also cover the naturopathic holistic options, herbs, herbal mushrooms, cannabis. And so everything should be included in your treatment program. And that’s where Human Nature came from.

Tim Pickett:

That’s cool. And that clinic is in South Ogden?

Marley Colt:

We’re at the Northern Utah Rehab Hospital in South Ogden.

Tim Pickett:

Awesome.

Chris Holifield:

Tell us about Kind Buds because this really intrigued me and perked my ears, because I’m a sucker for creating a business out of a necessity. And this is a necessity. I mean, I don’t know why I never thought about this. Because I could even see somebody like my mom taking advantage of something like this. She’s what, in her ’70s, and she she’s never smoked.

Marley Colt:

Right, never inhaled, is how we like to say it, never inhaled.

Chris Holifield:

So tell us about it. I mean, you and I talked about this, but let’s talk about it for listeners and for people listening.

Marley Colt:

So Kind Buds Cannabis Coaching was created in January 2021. It was mostly because somebody needed an option in between the doctor’s office and the pharmacy. So patients were coming to see us, they’re spending whatever amount of money, they’re spending an hour with us, they leave, they go get their medicine, they talk to the pharmacist, they’re still overwhelmed. They don’t remember anything that we’ve talked about. And they get home, they don’t want to waste their medicine. So they might not use it, they might use a little bit. We’ve seen people six months later that haven’t even touched their medicine-

Tim Pickett:

Or they use it and then they get high and then they’re uncomfortable-

Marley Colt:

Right, they have a bad time.

Tim Pickett:

They use it maybe three weeks later, and then that’s it.

Marley Colt:

Yeah, and the same thing that gave them a bad high once, gave them a bad… well, bad or just side effects-

Tim Pickett:

Right, they build up no tolerance, they don’t know how to use it-

Marley Colt:

… side effects per se, right. But then they don’t want to go back to the pharmacy and say, I didn’t like this. They feel wrong or something.

Chris Holifield:

Well, it’s even intimidating too. I mean, it’s a little-

Marley Colt:

Yeah, right. It’s even intimidating for me still, to go in the pharmacies.

Chris Holifield:

Sure.

Marley Colt:

So I started like a year ago just offering to come to people’s houses, and/or they can call me, video chat, and we can kind of talk. But over the last few months, I have about 10 patients I’ve gone to their home. And they’ve never been impaired. They’ve never inhaled their entire lives. And they were really, really afraid and nervous and all those things. So just sat down at their kitchen counter or on their couch and taught them how to grind their flower in a grinder, taught them how to load their vaporizer and then proceeded to teach them how to inhale cannabis. And I never thought that that would happen. I never thought that that would happen.

Tim Pickett:

So before we were talking about how, a lot of times I feel like I’m a person who teaches people, I’ve even been told, oh, you just teach people how to smoke weed for a living, right. But you literally teach people how to inhale, not smoke, because we’re in Utah. But you literally teach people how to use it.

Marley Colt:

Yeah, it’s a trippy thing, even for me.

Chris Holifield:

Well yeah, because you probably even have to kind of help them through their first time. Like even the way they feel. It’s like, okay just sit and be calm. Don’t get too excited.

Marley Colt:

And when they do first get their hit, a few people have done the same thing where they kind of close their eyes and shift their shoulders and they reach their arms out, like they feel it in their fingertips. They close their eyes and they’re like, this is nice, this is really nice. And they’re kind of touching their fingertips together. And we kind of just wait and see. But yeah, it’s basically teaching people to smoke weed. But I also educate them and help them. It’s awesome.

Chris Holifield:

It’s probably modified to each patient too. Because it’s hard to say, well, this is exactly what I do. Because each person probably has a different necessity, or a different thing what they need help with.

Tim Pickett:

What was it like the first time you went to somebody’s house, and you actually sat down with them? You’re sitting across the table from them, you’ve got the-

Marley Colt:

I totally wanted to record the whole experience. I wanted to set up my phone. But they’re medical patients, they probably anybody to know.

Tim Pickett:

So this is essentially, not technically under HIPAA, but because of the relationship that you have with them. But this is a very private moment for somebody. But also for you, I mean, was it scary sitting there teaching them this? Did you feel like a dealer?

Marley Colt:

For me, no. Because of where I work and the patients that I’ve seen, and the fact that I use it myself. It actually came across just very resonating and very simple. I was really nervous and then I was like, oh, I literally teach you to put this flower in the grinder, and then you grab it out of it with your little fingers like I do every day. So it was actually, once I officially started, it was really surreal. I definitely thought of my high school teachers and people that made fun of me for smoking or using it in high school. And just thought, wow, I’m going to change his life. I’m going to change.

Tim Pickett:

Yeah, I’m getting paid to teach somebody something that they were…

Marley Colt:

Yes. That literally nobody else will teach him.

Tim Pickett:

My mind is blown again.

Marley Colt:

Literally nobody else. And it’s just why I’m a good person for this, is just I’m so comfortable with cannabis. I’m secure with using it and I am a full responsible adult, and still use cannabis. And I feel like that comes across to the patients. They don’t feel me being anxious or nervous or paranoid or scared, because I don’t want them to feel any of those feelings their first time, I suppose. I want to keep it as positive, as happy…

Chris Holifield:

For people that haven’t used it, and again, I know it’s hard to really go into depth. I mean, we don’t want to really give out… But what are they thinking is going to happen, I guess? Are they nervous something’s going to happen…

Tim Pickett:

Yeah, what are the questions that you get right before that first inhale?

Chris Holifield:

Are they afraid they’re going to…

Marley Colt:

They do think that they’re going to hallucinate sometimes. Even if they know ultimately, they’re not going to hallucinate, they think something might happen with that first head rush. But that is specific to patients that have never been impaired before, never taken any kind of… some of them have taken strong opioids, some of them have not. Some people have never had a beer or any alcohol, they’ve never really had caffeine.

Chris Holifield:

So they don’t know what to expect at all with anything-

Marley Colt:

They have no idea, they have no idea. And they-

Tim Pickett:

They have never been altered, like never had that head change from alcohol, never had the head change from THC. Do you feel like you’re learning what your perfect person is, what your perfect customer or consumer or patient looks like?

Marley Colt:

No, I really, really like working with the beginners. Anybody that seems to know something, wants to go back to the way that they learned how to originally smoke weed and use cannabis. So I do like the beginners that haven’t been, I guess, overwhelmed with all of our other education and recommendations for cannabis. So the beginners are really, really fun. And they’re really patient. If they’ve invited me over into their house, they’ve already gotten into that mindset, this is going to happen. But they like having a partner, a buddy, a team member. But it’s even progressed from that, we use the cannabis and they say, is it working? I don’t know if it’s working. So then I don’t want to make them take another hit or rip right away, so I went and watched Fresh Prince of Bel Air on her couch with her for like 30 minutes. And she did, she paid me for that extra time.

Marley Colt:

But then she looked over at me like 15, 20 minutes later and she’s like, “I feel really nice.” She’s like, “I could sit here all night.” And normally she was only able to sit, stand, walk maybe 20, 30 minutes at a time. So it was noticeable for her. We just waited a few extra minutes, and I literally just watched TV with her.

Tim Pickett:

But you’re providing somebody who doesn’t have this otherwise. I mean, imagine a family who, they’ve got nobody in the family, Utah is full of families that are conservative, they’ve never had any experience with alcohol or THC at all. And you’re providing not only that specific education, that specific teaching, but you’re also providing that support.

Marley Colt:

I’m also your kind bud. I’m just your bud.

Tim Pickett:

You provide the specific education and that support system, you’re able to set expectations. Do you find that you’re teaching people to get a therapeutic dose, or you’re just teaching people how to use it. And then they’re probably going to find that therapeutic dose later.

Marley Colt:

I definitely let them know that they can find their therapeutic dose themselves. They don’t need me to guide them. But if they do want somebody to just help them, then I’m there for them. But they do get specific recommendations, like one to two puffs in the morning or evening, or this or that from Dr. Anden and [Christa 00:49:37]. So a lot of people that I’ve seen right now are patients we’ve seen in the office with cannabis cards. So a new unique thing is I have had two patients that don’t have cannabis cards, reach out to me. And it’s more, they want to learn if they qualify for the card. They don’t want to pay the fee for the card to see the doctor, until they get the education.

Marley Colt:

So they want me to come and educate them before they go and get a card. And I don’t know if they’ve inhaled or not, but that’s just kind of a whole nother clientele of people that don’t know where to go or where to start. And they can just text me, they can message me, I’ve got simple fees, or we can start a subscription. $10 a month, you call me whenever you want. But yeah, I’m getting a lot of people that don’t even have cards yet, that are interested in my educational services.

Tim Pickett:

Wow. How do people get ahold of you? How do people find you?

Marley Colt:

Right now, I do have @kindbudscoach on Instagram. Kindbudscoach.com is about to launch any day now. But usually they’ll get in contact with me through Human Nature Medical and Wellness, Dr. Anden’s office. They say, someone works with Dr. Anden, she’s awesome, call her. And they kind of get a hold of me through the office. But yeah, word is spreading. I’m getting some random emails, some random text messages. People want me to come. I’ve got a little family, I’ve got two daughters and a mom and a grandma that all want me to come over and teach them all together.

Tim Pickett:

Yeah, would you do what kind of a-

Chris Holifield:

Cannabis party.

Marley Colt:

Yeah-

Tim Pickett:

Like a Tupperware party, a cannabis party-

Marley Colt:

But everybody bring their own flower, I suppose. You use your own medicine-

Tim Pickett:

Right, you use your own medicine-

Chris Holifield:

And a little bit for you, too.

Marley Colt:

I, in particular, do not inhale when I’m with these guys. Just because I’m driving afterwards, and I do want to make sure I’m helping them as best as possible. But on the note of going there, visiting with them, I’ve had a few people that have asked me to come back over and reconnect their Wi-Fi to their computer. One lady paid me an extra hour to buy her things on Etsy. Some people just need a kind bud, they just need a friend sure help them with stuff.

Chris Holifield:

Sure, that’d be great. Like a smoking buddy, right?

Marley Colt:

Right, right.

Chris Holifield:

Come over and just hang out with me-

Tim Pickett:

I mean it’s kind of like a designated driver in some ways, right?

Marley Colt:

Right. And/or they have a positive experience, they learn cannabis is great, but they can’t tell anybody about it. They can’t tell their ward, they can’t tell their family, they can’t tell their kids. So they can really-

Tim Pickett:

This is a whole different thing I didn’t think about, Chris-

Marley Colt:

… they can really vent to me. They do that in the office. I’m sure you know, patients-

Tim Pickett:

Oh, yeah. I mean, for sure.

Marley Colt:

… You finally have an honest conversation with a provider, your whole life.

Tim Pickett:

Yeah, we get that all the time. Oh, you’re the first provider I’ve ever actually told, I don’t take this prescription that I’ve been prescribed for the past two years.

Marley Colt:

Yeah, kids are crazy. Kids are crazy.

Tim Pickett:

But then you’re somebody that they can open up to, they can experience this with, and they can learn the things that they might say later. Hey family, hey neighbor, I take this because it helps me feel better. This is legitimate medicine.

Marley Colt:

It doesn’t make me blackout and turn me into an abusive person. They they can learn from experience. And yeah, it helps people to be able to talk about their feelings and what they feel when they use it, and after and before. And if you just have to keep that all inside of you, that contributes to your pain, your anxiety, your stress. And nobody should feel bad for using cannabis. Be paranoid, but don’t be paranoid because you’re using cannabis.

Tim Pickett:

What’s your fees typically? Is there a simple kind of breakdown that people can expect?

Marley Colt:

So right now, just $75 an hour, and then any groups over two is $200 for an hour, because everyone has their own conditions and their own things. But we can do a 10, 15 minute text or courtesy call. My website is kindbudscoaching, and that will be up in the next week. And depending on the person, if they just want to talk 30 minutes, we can figure out a fee. I’ve had a few older people that have paid me on Venmo and then called me. So yeah, for now, I just like helping people. And I kind of try to do it when I’m not at my job. Office manager of Human Nature. But yeah, it’s just casual right now. And if people need me, they are finding me.

Tim Pickett:

Wow. I’m really-

Chris Holifield:

And also cooking. She’ll show people how to cook with medical cannabis too, I was looking on her flyer right here-

Tim Pickett:

Oh, cool. Yeah, I’m really happy about this, because we met at least a year ago. And you had talked about this even then. And so I’m really happy for you, Marley, that this is happening. And you’re able to start doing this.

Marley Colt:

Yeah.

Tim Pickett:

Because I could see then, you were really passionate about it.

Marley Colt:

We just didn’t have enough time in the office to tell people what they need to know. And then I feel like we’re wasting their money, if they’re not utilizing their medicine too. So yeah, it’s been awesome.

Tim Pickett:

Kindbudscoaching.com, and on Instagram it’s…

Marley Colt:

@kindbudscoach.

Tim Pickett:

Kindbudscoach.

Marley Colt:

And Marley Colt is my name-

Tim Pickett:

Marley Colt-

Chris Holifield:

I’m going to go follow that after we’re done talking.

Marley Colt:

We’ll have an ad in Salt Baked City, this next one that’s coming out. I’m putting an ad in there.

Chris Holifield:

Yeah, we just talked to Cole right before you. So there we go.

Marley Colt:

Yeah, I try not to have any high expectations. Whoever needs me will call me right now. I’m hoping in two to three years, we will have been a certified cannabis coach for three years and who knows the things that that will bring.

Tim Pickett:

That is awesome.

Chris Holifield:

Let’s bring Marley back on. We’ll have to do a catch up, right? A couple months down the road-

Tim Pickett:

Absolutely-

Marley Colt:

Yeah, I’m down. I’m totally down.

Chris Holifield:

Awesome. Well, thanks for chatting with us tonight Marley-

Marley Colt:

Yeah, thank you very much.

Chris Holifield:

Thank you so much.

Chris Holifield:

It’s as if you named the restaurant after yourself.

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

After my wonderful wife, who was crazy enough to ask me to marry her, and I was like, “Are you sure?”

Chris Holifield:

How long have you guys been married?

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

Four years. I was like, oh, crap, I forgot. Because we just keep a running total.

Chris Holifield:

Sure.

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

We celebrate every month, every second. And I don’t really keep up with the years anyway. I don’t even know how old my dog is. So that’s unfortunate. I just keep rolling day by day. But about six years, I think. Vivi’s giving me a look. Six years? Whew, yup.

Tim Pickett:

You’ve been together six years?

Chris Holifield:

Awesome.

Tim Pickett:

I’m getting a thumbs up down there.

Chris Holifield:

So between the both of you, whose idea more was it for WB’s?

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

Well, Weed and Bites, the cannabis lifestyle concept. That side of this direction for the entity is definitely more me. I am a medical card carrying patient, proud of it. It’s been the only thing that’s ever helped me with my anxiety and depression. And I’m really big on what we’re doing here, which is our industry, meet and greet, an alliance and an education. Because there’s so much misnomer out there, for myself included, a redneck from the South. Party on the riverbed every weekend, drinking. And if you smoked cannabis, it was like, nah, I’m an Alpha Delta Kappa, and you smoke cannabis? And then even when I got to college, it just didn’t, you were always drinking. It wasn’t a thing. And I don’t know, I’m a big fan of cannabis instead, if you’re going to recreate, I’ll tell you that. And I’m still medicate, not recreate.

Tim Pickett:

Yeah, now here at WB’s, the vibe, it’s not head shop, it’s-

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

Lifestyle.

Tim Pickett:

Yeah. Describe why or how that works.

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

Because I’m terrified to go to a head shop. I would never have ever gone anywhere other than with a medical card and the following compliance to consume. And I think there’s a lot more of me, who has been told a story of what cannabis is, that big evil, ugh. And now I’m picking up books, we have library, we provide education. We provide all sorts of things from the, what is it? It’s the exclusivity of being inclusive for us. And cannabis is just that. It brings all walks of life together. And WB’s Eatery, it’s a perfect environment for it. I mean, the Monarch where we exist is an artist’s working space. Cannabis, artwork, music, wonderful food, cocktails. And now with the market, where you can pick up books, just hang out. The actual thing here, I’m a restaurateur, but I said, “Don’t y’all ever make me work here. This is my creative space. And don’t make me work here.” And they haven’t yet, which is why I love my team.

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

But they do this. And what a fun job. You get to have education, you get to meet cool people like y’all, you get to be creative in the kitchen. And then maybe someday, when compliance shifts, we’ll be able to cook with it, which would be a really cool goal of ours.

Chris Holifield:

What’s the secret for juggling as many restaurants as you have, though? Because you have-

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

Strong teams-

Chris Holifield:

… at least what, three? How many three, four?

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

We have four concepts.

Chris Holifield:

Yeah.

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

We’re expanding, we’re rebuilding our foundation and we’re growing.

Chris Holifield:

Yeah.

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

And it was a really rough year. I don’t know if y’all know, but we had this gut in the restaurant industry. I had 100 employees and I ended up with about 20. And I had to recruit from out of state. It shifted us to an hourly paid model, from $12 to $21.50 an hour. And I am recruiting, so I apologize. But man, it sucks right now.

Chris Holifield:

No, it’s hard to get work-

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

I’m recruiting to the banker, I’m recruiting to the UPS driver, I’m like, we have benefits and we’ve changed. And when you make great change, and you just pick up an education that, I didn’t know, I was incentivized as a small business owner to keep people below living wage. I didn’t know that. And this whole thing, when you go through great change like that, we’re going to keep this lifestyle. And then now still, you get to talk about cannabis while you’re at work. What? Crazy.

Chris Holifield:

People walking down the street here in Ogden, I’m curious what, I mean I’m sure you hear feedback when you walk in, right? Like when people walk in and they look around and they’re like, wait a minute, what is this place? And then they might see a pot leaf, or they might see even your thing, potheads welcome.

Tim Pickett:

Yeah, they might see a tincture for sale, the CBD, and they see the coffee shop.

Chris Holifield:

They’re like, wait, what?-

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

My bud vase.

Tim Pickett:

Your bud vase, not a bong-

Chris Holifield:

What do people say?

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

Not a bong, because you can’t do that in Utah, that’s not cool. We only vaporize, and that’s it.

Chris Holifield:

Do you hear any feedback from random people, like any thoughts?

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

I think that everybody’s still relatively confused by what we’re doing. And I still say it’s because we had a pandemic. We opened in November, we closed in March, I paid them to color positive notes to the universe on there to-go orders. And it was like, I’m going bankrupt. And now PPP loans and then having forgiven and grants, and now taking out another round of EDIL, and I’ll probably get that shit backwards, apologize. But I’m going to go in debt. And so if I’m going to go in debt, then I can’t count on just restaurants anymore. So this is the other part to WB’s Eatery. It’s multiple streams of income in here. We have CBD, aside from more than a restaurant, we’re a lifestyle. We have eCommerce, bud boxes, the things that you would want shipped to your house so that you can enjoy this lifestyle.

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

And all of those are, everybody hates it, but it’s a pandemic pivot. And it’s called, we’re entrepreneurs. And we’re more than a restaurant, we’re a lifestyle. And now holding the Weed Social, I mean, wow, it’s amazing.

Tim Pickett:

Okay, now it all makes sense to me.

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

Does it? Usually people are never quite in line with-

Tim Pickett:

Yes, I really think it all makes sense to me.

Chris Holifield:

It all came together for you, the pieces just-

Tim Pickett:

As somebody who started a business during the pandemic and grew the business last year during the pandemic, I get it. The multiple streams of income, this lifestyle, you’ve got the boxes, good staff and you’re having a hard time recruiting. You are on your way, I think here. I love this place. I can’t say it enough.

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

It’s a vortex of positive energy, think about it.

Chris Holifield:

The only downfall is I live in Salt Lake, so it’s a little tougher for me to come to-

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

Pig Kitchen will be hosting events and doing pop-up WB’s Eatery events, specifically.

Chris Holifield:

Okay.

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

And because we’re sister concepts, Pig Kitchen, located in Holiday is a food hall that we’re rebranding, basically. Moving away from Pig and a Jelly Jar, there’s a food truck novelty outside, there’s a beer garden courtyard. And now you’ll have WB’s Eatery that’ll pop up. And maybe we’ll do another Weed Social, I don’t know. But dry cocktails will be there, we’ll be bringing in our Drag Trivia, featuring [Sequoia 01:02:50] who does a show here for us also monthly. So also getting into events, not something from the restaurant world. Matter of fact, with Pig and a Jelly Jar and other concepts, I’m always like, no, I don’t cater. No, we don’t do that. It’s been so hard just to operate. And now my staff, do think I’m crazy half the time. Because I’m like, uh-uh, wait, what’s coming next? Wait, what’s coming next? And what lifestyle do you want? Because it’s not about 50 cents or $1 more a year? It can’t be. It just can’t. Because let me tell you, you can go out of business like that.

Tim Pickett:

Does your staff, when you come in and you’re like, hey, guess what we’re going to do? Guess what I changed last night? Everything. Or I added this, we’re going to do this event-

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

No, it’s more of an addition, it’s a growth. And see, that’s cool, too. It’s really a growing process. And it’s with our communication and it’s with how we develop this concept because it was grown. It did not start with the market. I laughed, I kept jumping up and down like a maniac. “We’re not a wine bar. You just wait, I can’t play with it yet. I’ll be there. We’re trying to survive.” And it was because it’s pretty. Isn’t it pretty? This was my, what do they call it? Passion project. I have a bunch of notebooks, that’s how I manifest my ideas. And they’re not ideations because each notebook is done. And this was the closest I could get to my tiny house. My wife wanted to collaborate and I was like, cool, your mom’s shimmy cheery rocks.

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

And we went to Loom, it inspired sparklers and positivity and chakra realignment, which I would have told you, okay, maybe. But then to come back and see what we were working and doing to each other, I was like, we have to create something different. And even Pig and a Jelly Jar, taking all those tables and chairs out for the compliance, I’m not bringing them back. When you make great change, you do not go backwards. You can assess where you are, but then you need to look where you’re going. And that’s how we just need to talk to each other. And we do it in our hiring, we do it in our coaching and training. And now it’s the first round, so we still have a lot of that restaurant behavior that we’re working on. But we’re a team.

Chris Holifield:

Yeah, I like that. I think a lot of us can learn from that, yeah.

Tim Pickett:

Yeah, it does take a great team of people to get on board. And that I can definitely attest to, this type of post COVID world and business ownership, it really takes a great team.

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

It does. And I think that’s why I’ve always been successful anyway. I mean, I tell these guys openly, McDonald’s at 20, first job at 16. Now all of a sudden, I got their highest volume store and 50 employees. Because there’s a lot of this, I don’t know how to do this. There’s not a training map. And I make a joke. Yeah, this isn’t Chili’s, we’re not there yet. It’s not franchise, man. It’s a notebook. And then, oh, my goodness, look who made that chalkboard for us? How cool. And we’re just starting to grow. My wife left corporate America, same thing. I say, I need help, for one. But we need to grow. We have a legitimate thing here that if nothing else, we can have four healthy concepts and enjoy our lifestyles and so can they.

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

Because restaurants are this machine that chews people up. It’s operations, it’s entry level, anything. And if you don’t see the light at the end of the tunnel, or be able to see a path that you can move forward on, I know, you’ll feel trapped by your own reality. And I hated the restaurants. And now I can work with them, I’m a little bit older. This is another thing. I’m 45, almost 46. They’re a little younger. And I’m like, I’m y’all’s moms’ age, knock it off. I’m not your mother. Now go do the dishes. See?

Tim Pickett:

It works easier than when you were 32.

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

Oh, lordy no, but I know what my mom goes through. I’ll tell you what, we were pains in the behind. And these guys, we’re like four-step growth process. Four steps. Operations, creation, which is marketing, innovation, which is sales and services and our eCommerce, we have bar boxes and these lifestyle boxes. And they can get a percentage of sales in selling CBD. And the last one is ownership and investment. Why not? I have everything I possibly could want. And I almost went out of business last year. And I still could, still can happen. I almost got shot in the streets of Tulum two weeks ago, on my wife’s birthday. I actually had a gun pointed at my head. And let me tell you, when you come back and you’re like, you could get shot in the street in Tulum! We’ve got to figure out how to be kinder to each other and just enjoy what we do.

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

And minimally, what lifestyle do you want? Go to Aruba. The [inaudible 01:07:24] finally took a vacation in the kitchen. Let me pay for you to take a vacation, come back. Or don’t, let’s open a business together.

Chris Holifield:

Have you always been this way?

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

Maniacal? I get maniacal a lot. Maybe, I don’t know. I don’t know, I get excited, I’m passionate. That’s why I don’t like to do a lot of interviews, because I just feel it’s a team, and show up.

Chris Holifield:

Do you ever have bad days though? Do you wake up and just be like, I’m not going to work today. Do you like, I just don’t want to do it.

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

Sure, of course-

Chris Holifield:

What do you do on those days? Just stay in bed?

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

Yeah. I mean, I struggle with depression. Some days it’s hard for me to put my pants on, is what it feels like.

Chris Holifield:

And that’s when you go-

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

Cannabis has really, really been helpful.

Chris Holifield:

Sure.

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

And then keeping notebooks and dosing and incorporating into my own personal lifestyle, and then attracting that energy of people who are like-minded. And again, where’s the education? There’s lots of dialogue. There’s lots of growth. And it’s not every roster, firing stone or pothead bull crap, because that wouldn’t attract me. I would actually have steered clear from that. And I think that we have an obligation to say that, we’re more than that. We’re entrepreneurs. In the industry of cannabis, in the restaurant community. And no one gets to say nothing about it. Nobody signs your paycheck. But you, if you’re an entrepreneur, right? So there’s a lot of growth process for everybody in this industry and in the restaurant industry. I think they lend themselves very much to the same people.

Tim Pickett:

Do you think that cannabis-friendly restaurants will become more popular?

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

I hope so. I think cannabis belongs right here. Right here in Ogden, I do swear it. I know in Salt Lake somewhere, somebody’s mad at me. But look at this. Look at this vibe. This is the Nine Rails Creative District. This is in the 1920s, where those good conversations were happening when people were parking their Model T’s here and having lunch and whatnot at the Ben Lomond. This is historic. And I still say this community, it needs to be revitalized in a sense that cannabis is a good fit here. And cannabis is more than all that negative association that we’ve been lied to about it. It’s just simply not true. So I hope cannabis in Ogden can form an alliance. And then minimally, be a place where you meet around the table up here once a month and we can work on a movement. Instead of compartmentalizing, which is another thing unfortunately people like to do.

Chris Holifield:

So would you like to see full blown adult recreation then? You would like to see it fully legalized?

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

Sure.

Chris Holifield:

Yeah, why not?

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

I think people should be able to do whatever they want. And I think drinking is horrible, in my opinion. And our behaviors, and what we allow, and how we vilify people who do recreate with cannabis. And I think it comes down to money. And you’ll get me sounding like some political person, and I’m not. But what’s good for one needs to be good for all. And I don’t think that keeping cannabis away from people is a good idea. I think it’s quite helpful, especially when you’re talking opioids and you’re talking seven years sober. And we’re self medicating, and we’re told lifestyle and drinking and that behavior is okay. And so still here, that’s what I’m doing. I still have a ritual, I still craft our dinners and our courses with their non-alcoholic cocktails, dry cocktails. It was a research and development, because I want to be a part of the lifestyle.

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

I don’t have to drink Kool Aid, just because I don’t drink your alcohol. By the way, I’m probably going to not have the same reputation I had when I was a drinker. Thank goodness, cellphones weren’t that popular, jeez.

Chris Holifield:

I know, we would have all gotten in trouble.

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

I’m glad I’m old enough to have missed this, slightly. You’d have to read about me in the paper. And nobody reads that either anyway, so we’re all right. It’s going to be okay.

Chris Holifield:

Any other questions before… I mean, what’s the best way people can come in with their-

Tim Pickett:

Yeah, what’s the best way people can interact with this?

Chris Holifield:

Yeah, interact.

Tim Pickett:

With this movement, I think, that would be my question-

Chris Holifield:

Find out what’s going on and be connected to-

Tim Pickett:

How can make WB’s the center of that relationship between Ogden and cannabis-

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

Industry, alliance and education. And it’s where good conversations happen around the food industry. All good ideas come from a good meal. And now you can have your cocktail or non-alcoholic cocktail. But it’s these alliances and conversation and this networking that brings bud tenders, brings patients, brings a novice who has no idea, but just feels comfortable. Because we’re a restaurant, at the end of the day, aren’t we? I mean we’re a restaurant.

Tim Pickett:

Right, you can come, it’s-

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

You can get a cocktail, you can-

Tim Pickett:

… It’s definitely not intimidating here.

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

Totally not.

Tim Pickett:

Definitely not intimidating.

Chris Holifield:

See, and I didn’t know what to expect. Tonight’s my first night here. So I didn’t know what to expect, is it going to be intimidating, is it not? Even if you’re not into cannabis, it’s a great place to come.

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

I hope so. [crosstalk 01:12:00]-

Chris Holifield:

I mean, that’s what you want-

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

It’s so open to everyone. And even to do a Drag Brunch and have a Wellness Wednesday yoga class that we’re going to bring in, it is still all about cannabis. And specifically CBD for us, because we have our own CBD label. And we have our own non alcoholic cocktail book. And we’re still just enjoying the lifestyle of creativity. And anytime we can have you guys come and provide education, and if people can understand this, it’s just a place to chill. Hash out, hang out with your buds, right?

Chris Holifield:

Hang out with your real life buds and your buds in your pocket, I guess.

Tim Pickett:

Yeah, congratulations.

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

Thanks. I smile so big every time I come here. That’s why if I’m in a bad mood, I’m like, I don’t know. I don’t want to go and bring that energy to the space because, I’m proud. I really am.

Tim Pickett:

Yeah, you should be. I mean you can tell, just talking to you, that this is really a realization of who you are.

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

Yeah, it’s been a journey. And last couple years, we’re a healing process. And now, we’re growing. Because isn’t that how it works? It is. You don’t have to kill the plant, snuff it out. Sometimes you can get the plant back to a healthy state. And then it starts to bud and grow again. And I feel like we are that. And this space, it’s inclusive to everyone.

Chris Holifield:

Exactly. Well, thanks for chatting.

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

Yeah.

Tim Pickett:

Thanks Amy-

Chris Holifield:

Anything else you want to add, really quick? I mean, this is going to be our last conversation-

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

Just come support these guys. I mean, restaurants need help, industry needs help, everyone needs support, come out and be kind to one another. That’s all I ask. Come and be kind and support these folks. Because where our restaurants are, we hire within our communities. And we do recruit from out of state. But I trust you, every one of them take ownership of their stores and their communities. And I think that’s another thing that’s amazing about our company.

Chris Holifield:

Exactly. So if any of our listeners need a job, reach out. There you go. It’d be a cool place to work.

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

Oh, I will say one more. You ready?

Chris Holifield:

Yeah.

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

Just on a recruiting. If you can get someone to get an interview, we’ll give you a $50 gift card. Pig and a Jelly Jar, WB’s Eatery. If they get hired and they stay six weeks, we’ll give you and them 100 bucks.

Chris Holifield:

No way.

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

$12 to $21.50 an hour-

Tim Pickett:

Challenge accepted-

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

$12 to $21.50 an hour, plus benefits. We’re working on medical and dental, but at least it’s 401(k) with a 4% match. And yeah, we’re more than a restaurant, we’re a lifestyle.

Chris Holifield:

Awesome.

Tim Pickett:

Way cool.

Chris Holifield:

All right, so if you’re going to go and reach out, hit me up so I can get that gift card.

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

Yep. And your name. Tell them to mention you. Anyone listening, Todd at Kentucky Fried Chicken listening, you get someone, Sally who comes in and applies. And they say, Todd heard you on this podcast, 50 bucks, come find me.

Tim Pickett:

There you go-

Chris Holifield:

All right, there you go. Awesome. Well thank you so much and-

Tim Pickett:

Thanks Amy-

Chris Holifield:

… it’s been a fun night here at WB’s. I think this is going to be our last-

Tim Pickett:

Absolutely is-

Chris Holifield:

… conversation tonight.

Tim Pickett:

Yeah, at WB’s the Weed Social that we’ve been to, sponsored by Salt Baked City. I’m Tim Pickett…

Chris Holifield:

And I’m Chris Holifield.

Tim Pickett:

You can find all of our podcasts on utahmarijuana.org/podcast every week, Friday.

Chris Holifield:

Friday 4:20 AM, it launches a new episode right in your podcast app there.

Tim Pickett:

All right everybody.

Chris Holifield:

Thank you so much.

Amy Wanderley-Britt:

I appreciate y’all, really.

Tim Pickett:

All right. Stay safe out there.

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