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Did you catch our live Q&A session on April 1st? If you didn’t, it’s okay. We won’t hold it against you. In fact, we recorded the whole thing for you so that you don’t miss out on the education and conversation had. Watch the 90-minute video below as Tim Pickett, founder of utahmarijuana.org & Blake Smith, CSO of Zion Medicinal, discuss Medical Marijuana for mental health conditions before turning the floor over to you and taking all your burning questions. If 90 minutes is more than you can spare, don’t worry. We’ll be cutting this up into bite-size pieces to make it easier for you to find the information you’re looking for. Subscribe to the Discover Marijuana YouTube channel to be notified when those go live.

We asked you to submit your questions early and all through the event, but we had so much fun geeking out about Medical Cannabis that we couldn’t answer all of them without keeping you there overnight! (But really, how much fun would a Discover Marijuana Sleepover with Tim & Blake be?) Here are all the questions we didn’t get a chance to discuss.

Where can I find information on how to qualify for cannabis cultivation licensure in Utah?

There are no current cultivation licenses available. Contact the Department of Agriculture  —more cultivation licenses must be added to the legislature before more become available.

I have bad nerve pain in both feet from peripheral neuropathy. Does cannabis help with nerve pain?

Yes, CBD is neuroprotective and is a mild anti-inflammatory. Combined with THC, it can decrease nerve pain. Some patients report a substantial decrease with the right dosing. We recommend ratios of 5mg CBD to 1mg THC to start, increasing the dosing to reach the desired effect. Sometimes it helps immediately, sometimes it takes a while with consistent use at low to moderate doses to see any results. Visiting with a QMP will be helpful.

How does cannabis help sickle cell patients?

Neither Blake nor Tim know of any significant data on sickle cell and cannabis. It might help with some of the pain, but no data has been released supporting the fact that it would help the underlying condition.

How would you capture the Mormon mom stay-at-home market?

What a question! I do not believe you will capture the market by showing bong rips or smoking joints. We have to build trust in the system, trust in the providers, and trust in the patients as well. If we are respectful to the plant and its potential benefits, while being honest about the risks and the stigma, I think we can make headway with a lot of different cultures and populations.

Is there a program for disabled veterans?

There is no specific program for disabled veterans. Tim’s clinic, UTTHC, offers a discount to veterans. We also offer free consultations and checkups during your first eight months in the program. Federal law protects veteran benefits when veterans participate in a state Medical Marijuana program, so you’ve got nothing to lose.

What is in cannabis that gives you dry mouth?

Cannabis inhibits saliva production by stimulating the CB1 and CB2 receptors. It’s the same stimulation that occurs with Anandamide. Anandamide is the endocannabinoid that stimulates CB1 receptors. This molecule is increased with physical activity, which is why running gives you a dry mouth and makes you thirsty. It’s the same mechanism.

Seems like I find something that really works for me and then when I go get it again, they don’t sell it anymore and they never know when they’re going to get it back. Any suggestions?

There are two suggestions I have. The first is to be patient, as consistent supply will come over the next 1-2 years. The second suggestion is to purchase your own CBD oilzion medicinal cbd tincture thc:cbd 1:1 tincture packages medical marijuana for mental health (Zion makes a great one that is available in most Utah Medical Cannabis pharmacies and all UTTHC clinic locations!). Then, purchase stronger products in the pharmacies and mix your own ratios. I guess a third suggestion would be to keep a journal about what ratios and milligrams of cannabinoids are in the products you choose. This way, when you go to the pharmacy and they do not have what you need, you can try to find something similar. Keeping a journal is always a good choice.

What’s up with all the Delta 8 saturating the market? Why would companies be selling it to patients as if it’s a product completely made from cannabis and listing it as part of the total THC content?

Stay tuned for an upcoming video about Delta 8 and its benefits and downfalls.

As a local cannabis business, how can we compete with larger out-of-state cannabis businesses moving into Utah?

As for Tim, out-of-state businesses don’t play much into the success of his business. However, when it comes to Zion, Utah law protects them by not allowing other operators to open businesses until the law is changed. Once that law changes, there are no guarantees. Anybody who is in the cannabis business will tell you we live in a constant state of change. It can be hard to keep up.

I don’t feel that the Zion products help with nerve pain. Can you talk about that?

This is a really interesting statement that ultimately points to the fact that all products and people are different. Here’s another example: in medical school, we’re taught to treat depression with one of five medications. All have the potential to help the patient. If no improvement is made in the condition in a month or so, we change the medications. We are taught to try 3-4 different medicines before changing the class of medicine (antidepressants to stimulants, for example.) The same is true for cannabis. In fact, cannabis is even more finicky. I would recommend trying a different brand, different cannabinoid ratios, different terpene profiles, different delivery methods. With care and determination, always keeping a journal, you’ll have the best chance of finding something that helps. Blake won’t take it personally if you don’t use his product. The important thing to both of us is that you feel better.

Does Delta 9 THC degrade to Delta 8, or does cannabis naturally contain both?

Keep an eye out for an upcoming episode about all our favorite Deltas!

Would cannabis be a good solution for anxiety? Specifically the Delta 8 THC cannabinoid? I have heard conflicting statements.

Tim & Blake will be releasing a video in the near future to answer all your questions about Delta 8, Delta 9, Delta 10, etc.

I’ve heard that cannabis causes blood thinning. If I used a topical after surgery, would that be okay?

There is some debatable evidence about blood thinning and cannabis use. All of the evidence, however, relates to ingested methods — inhaled or oral. We aren’t aware of any evidence that topical cannabis could cause an increase in bleeding risk. Slather it on, you should be good to go!

I like the idea of softening pathways and creating new thought patterns with PTSD symptoms. I also appreciate this info about ADME! Do tinctures distribute and effect differently than vaping?

Once the molecules are in the bloodstream, they’re going to distribute the same. There are some complicated differences in the bioavailability of inhaled methods versus ingestibles, though. Inhaled products cross directly into the bloodstream without any metabolism or breakdown, so the bioavailability is very high and depends on the concentration of the product being inhaled. Digestion and absorption go through the liver, which changes the molecules and reduces bioavailability. Edibles can be 30 to 50% absorbed compared to inhaled methods. However, once it goes to the liver, THC can be transformed into a slightly different metabolite much stronger than THC. Therefore, edibles can sometimes cause a stronger reaction in the body, even though they are less bioavailable.

Keep an eye out for an upcoming article about this topic on the utahmarijuana.org blog. It’ll be pretty technical. Good question! Generally, no, there’s no difference in distribution and effect between delivery methods, only in the medications/product taken.

What treatment/products do you recommend for fibromyalgia?

We recommend starting with a decent amount of CBD combined with THC. Sometimes adding other cannabinoids can help, depending on the individual. Fibromyalgia is one condition where keeping a journal is paramount. Keep track of what you’re taking, be consistent, and you’ll likely find something that helps you feel better over time. I would say most patients require 4-6 weeks before really dialing it in. Try to stay positive and don’t give up!

Is CBD good for young kids (3-7 years old) with anxiety or do they need to stay away from all cannabinoids until older?

Well, the endocannabinoid system isn’t fully developed until a person reaches 20-25 years old. That being said, we give our kids ibuprofen and Tylenol without batting an eye just because it’s FDA approved. Cannabinoids are naturally occurring and some amount of CBD is likely safer for all age groups. While I can’t provide specific medical advice for this question, in general, I would say trying a CBD product you trust for one or two months at low doses seems reasonable to me.

We have a handful of patients under 16 — the youngest of which is under two years old — who use CBD in low-to-moderate doses with pretty good results. Be honest about your child’s CBD use with your pediatrician or other medical providers. If you need more assistance or information, don’t hesitate to reach out and schedule an appointment with me to talk about it. We offer free phone consultations for all pediatric patients to help determine what the next steps are.


Tim & Blake can’t thank you enough for your support of the Discover Marijuana educational video series. We’ve had so much fun creating these videos for you and bringing frank, unbiased education to the people of Utah and beyond. There’s so much more Tim & Blake to come, so stay tuned! Subscribe to the Discover Marijuana YouTube channel to be the first to see new episodes, live sessions, and more educational videos about Medical Cannabis. Comment below to let us know what topics you’d like us to cover in a future episode, and subscribe to the utahmarijuana.org mailing list below to receive bonus content, invitations to events, and more.

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