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Utah in the Weeds Episode #67 - Amy Hollenbaugh from SLC Haze

What to Expect in This Episode

Episode 67 of Utah in the Weeds features an interview with SLC Haze owner Amy Hollenbaugh, someone who has decades of personal experience using cannabis as a medical product. She spoke with Chris and Tim at length about her own history and how she prefers to run her business.

Amy was first introduced to cannabis around age ten by way of a disabled aunt who used the plant for pain relief. [05:40] It was a one-time thing. She didn't try it again until being diagnosed with cancer as a young adult living in Hawaii. Back then, medical cannabis couldn't be legally purchased. She and the friend who introduced her to it grew their own plants.[10:05]

Hollenbaugh moved back to California just after the state legalized medical cannabis. She has first-hand experience with Medical Cannabis Card programs in their infancy. [12:45] She was also an early adopter of the cannabis business model.

These days, she is in Sandy, running a business that brought her to Utah. [16:50] SLC Haze is a retail outlet that sells mainly hemp (CBD) products, including gummies and tinctures. They even sell clothing and bags made from hemp textiles. [18:30]

SLC Haze also offers a variety of products that have nothing to do with CBD. The store places a heavy emphasis on overall wellness, so there are two separate therapy rooms staffed by medical professionals who utilize a variety of techniques to help people enjoy better health. To say that the store is different is an understatement.[17:40]

Episode 67 is truly unique in that it touches on aspects of cannabis that Tim and Chris have not publicly discussed before. Likewise, Amy Hollenbaugh is a fascinating guest with a quite different perspective. If you haven't yet heard an episode of UITW, this is a good one to start with.

Resources in This Episode

 

Podcast Transcript

Chris Holifield:

Let's welcome everybody out to Episode 67 of Utah in the Weeds. Here we are, Tim, we're doing this in person. It's been a while.

Tim Pickett:

Yeah, it has been a little while. This summer, cadence has been nice in some ways, but I miss it.

Chris Holifield:

Yeah.

Tim Pickett:

So it's good to get to record and this is a good interview. I didn't introduce myself. I'm Tim Pickett.

Chris Holifield:

I'm Chris Holifield.

Tim Pickett:

You can find all of our podcasts, all 67 episodes on Utah Marijuana.org/Podcast. Today we interviewed the owner of SLC Haze.

Chris Holifield:

Amy Hollenbaugh.

Tim Pickett:

Amy knows a lot about the history of cannabis over the past 30 years, right? You listen to this interview, it's fascinating to go through because she really lived the whole thing from before the 90s to the California 90s. The experience of that.

Chris Holifield:

Now what she's doing in Utah with SLC Haze.

Tim Pickett:

Right. She talks a lot about our store. She's got a patient appreciation day that we talked a little bit about it in the interview, but I just want to mention it here. Sunday, August 15th at Lagoon, tickets are $55 at SLC Haze. You can go pick up a ticket there. Her shop is at 8585 South State Street. This is going to be a cool event. There's some live music there and a good way to spend the day at Lagoon.

Chris Holifield:

We talked about it a little bit in depth in this interview with Amy. So make sure to listen to the whole interview. That way you can find out about the event happening.

Tim Pickett:

Absolutely.

Chris Holifield:

At Lagoon

Tim Pickett:

The other housekeeping thing for us is Utah Therapeutic Health Center is opening up a clinic in Cedar City in the next couple of weeks.

Chris Holifield:

Congratulations.

Tim Pickett:

Thank you. August 9th is our first clinic day, 9th and 10th. We're going to be open two days a week down there. The calendar is live on UtahMarijuana.org. You can schedule visits now. We are going to be down at the Cedar City Beer Fest this weekend, so come if you're down there. If you want to take a trip down south this weekend, we're going to be there all day Saturday. We're going to give away some stuff in raffles. We've got some fresh new hats and merch, trying to get the word out down in southern Utah that patients have access.

Chris Holifield:

Yeah. I'm looking at one of these hats right now. I can't wait until they're available to everybody.

Tim Pickett:

Yeah, they're pretty cool. I'm wearing the gray flat bill now. It's really getting fun in this industry. We're talking to a lot of people, we're getting involved, the community's out. The weed social at WB's, Vivi and Amy. If you listen back a few episodes, we recorded up there with them as guests. Those are happening. Cole's got his magazine out now on a regular cadence.

Chris Holifield:

The dispensaries are open.

Tim Pickett:

All of them are open, there's going to be 15th sometime next year. So yeah. Things are rolling.

Chris Holifield:

It's a wonderful time to be alive here in Utah, right?

Tim Pickett:

That's right.

Chris Holifield:

It's exciting. It really is.

Tim Pickett:

It is.

Chris Holifield:

Then UtahMarijuana.org, I know you mentioned it, but there's tons of stuff on your website, Tim. Articles, blog articles plus the podcast. I mean, that's where you come-

Tim Pickett:

Yeah. Plus podcast, plus the Discover Marijuana YouTube. Last week, the podcast was really part of that, that interaction between the two worlds, the video with the YouTube and Discover Marijuana. We really just want to give everybody, we want to build that classroom with the Discover Marijuana Series. We want to build a community with the podcast, and we want to help people in clinic.

Chris Holifield:

How can people get on your email list, Tim, at UtahMarijuana.org? Is there a tab there or something that people can sign up?

Tim Pickett:

One of the best ways actually is go to UtahMarijuana.org. Click on the pre screen, do a 42.0 second pre screen, right? Find out if you qualify or if you think you would qualify for a card, you'll get on our email list. You can scroll right to the bottom of that page and join the email list. You'll stay up to date on we have information on delivery and what's happening in the industry, what products are being grown available. The podcast episodes are all housed there.

Chris Holifield:

There's tons. I look forward to when I see. I'm like, "Cool. There's another email," because I'm always learning something from it.

Tim Pickett:

Yeah, it's been fun now. We're on episode 67. We've been doing this for a year and a half. That just shows we're here. We're going to keep doing this. The information is always going to be there.

Chris Holifield:

So make sure you're subscribed. I don't know what podcast player you listen in. But hopefully, this podcast is there. If this podcast is not in a podcast player, let Tim or myself know. I'll make sure it gets there. If you want to come on the podcast, let Tim or myself know. We'd love to probably bring you on as long as you have some cannabis related sorry. Right?

Tim Pickett:

Yeah. coming up this fall we've got some really great guests coming up.

Chris Holifield:

Man.

Tim Pickett:

So you got to get subscribed. Things are going to heat up.

Chris Holifield:

Let's get into this interview though with Amy, this is a good one you guys. Thank you so much for listening. Seriously without you guys, there would be no Tim and I. So thank you so much for listening. Let's get into this conversation.

 


Chris Holifield:

I want to go back to as far back as you want to go, the first time you ever used cannabis. I mean, what was that experience for you? Did you use it just recreationally or medicinally?

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Well, that's funny.

Chris Holifield:

I guess, it's medicinally, however you used it. Right?

Amy Hollenbaugh:

My aunt let me smoke off her joint when I was 10 or 11 years old one time because I kept bugging her. She's my favorite aunt. She used to take me to the Rocky Horror Picture Show. She was always so jolly. Actually she was born deformed. So she has really short arms. So they're only as long as her elbow. She only has a couple of fingers on each one. They're real bony. Anyways, I think it's really painful. So she used cannabis as pain relief. That wasn't why I was using it at 10 or 11 years old. But anyways, I didn't continue to use it. I just tried it out one time and see what it was all about.

Chris Holifield:

Do you remember? Do you remember though back I mean 10 years old?

Amy Hollenbaugh:

I totally remember. Yeah, I was all giggly. We actually went to the Rocky Horror Picture Show with a bunch of her friends that we usually did that with. I can remember that I had a great time that night. Yeah. We went to the belly dancing restaurant. It was super fun. I remember being very giggly and talkative.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

So anyways, I'm pretty shy to begin with. So maybe that helped me come out of my shell. So I didn't use for even through really in high school. So I didn't really use again till a boyfriend introduced me to it when I was going through cancer stuff in my early 20s. We were living in Hawaii. We had a friend who had it. They could see what I was going through. So they just offered it to me. Boy, it just changed my whole world with anxiety, with pain, with help, just everything I was going through.

Chris Holifield:

You were saying cancer stuff.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Yeah.

Chris Holifield:

Do you care to talk a little bit about that?

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Yeah, for sure. Yeah. So when I was in my late 20s, I got diagnosed with some uterine and ovarian cancer. I had already been really sick throughout most of my teenage years and even prior to that, which was all immune system related. But they didn't really know that due to probably ... I mean, I lived in South Eastern Ohio. Yeah, doctors back then I don't think were advanced as they are now. They didn't know what was causing immune stuff back then or I don't even think it was called immune, autoimmune-

Chris Holifield:

Yeah. Autoimmune disease.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Or a deficiency or anything. I don't even think those words were used. But I would say mostly looking back now, and reflecting on my health practices and my wellness practices, both mentally, spiritually, physically, definitely I say probably a lot of it attributed to was environmental. Because we lived in a coal mining town. So I would say that's probably where a lot of the toxicity originated from. Then it just compounded from there or from bad habits or not taking care of yourself, not eating right, just all that stuff compounded, compounded, compounded.

Tim Pickett:

Then you end up in Hawaii. Were you diagnosed with cancer in Hawaii?

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Actually I had been diagnosed prior to that and had a surgery that took care of it. Then it came back. So this was now the comeback of it. Being in Hawaii, your access to everything is limited without it being really expensive. So when my friend introduced me to the plant, and he just grew his own, all of his own because I couldn't find it anywhere. I said, "Well, how do you get this." He says, "Oh, I just have to grow my own." That's where it all started really taking off in our life. Because I love gardening, so I just got a hold of some seeds. It was really easy actually in Hawaii to make it happen.

Chris Holifield:

What was easy about it in Hawaii?

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Well, you have the sun and the temperatures that are super fabulous. I would say the hardest thing that we encountered was when it was time to take it down or just keeping the rain off of it because it does rain every day in Hawaii. So for a short amount of time, that's why everything is so lush and green and beautiful.

Tim Pickett:

Are these plants growing over your head?

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Yeah.

Tim Pickett:

These are big, big plants.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Yeah. So this was a pretty long time ago. This was, let's see, in Hawaii. This was back in the early 90s. You didn't want to get caught doing anything like that. Right? So we grew our plants in the top of the avocado trees.

Tim Pickett:

Oh, wow.

Chris Holifield:

Wait. So actually in the top of the trees?

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Yeah.

Chris Holifield:

You'd put a pot in the top of the plant, in the top of the tree?

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Yeah.

Chris Holifield:

Is that help with the smell of it or what?

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Just all of it. Yeah, it wasn't noticeable on the ground. So if someone found it, they didn't rob you of it if they wanted it. Or if they found it and didn't want you growing it, then out of sight, out of mind. Right? You don't get reported. So I mean, you just have to be cautious about these kinds of things back in that date.

Tim Pickett:

Right. I mean, you're not growing fields of it. Right?

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Yeah. Definitely not. It wasn't fields, it was only a few plants for personal use really. But it turned out really good. So we caught on that we had a green thumb. Then we had to go back to California, move back to California because we had a family member that was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. He was doing pretty bad. So we went back to help the family really and help him and just be a support system because being across on an island is not really supportive for anyone. So back to California, we went to Lake Tahoe. Then what do you know, the plant wasn't available there really either. Okay.

Tim Pickett:

This was in the 90s?

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Now we're in the late 90s. So they had just passed medicinal.

Chris Holifield:

Yeah. 1996 in California.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

So you had to go get this card, the only place to get it pretty much in Northern California, was in San Francisco. So an entire trip had to be planned. San Francisco, I live five and a half hours from San Francisco. So you had to plan to go into the city. The card was $475 back then.

Chris Holifield:

Bah.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

It was good for a year but they were pretty particular about who they were giving out cards to at the beginning. So you had to come with all your medical.

Tim Pickett:

Yeah, this is before. There were some really big court cases after that a few years when physicians were involved in whether or not we could talk to patients using our First Amendment right. That was not established when California decided to pass the law.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Yeah.

Tim Pickett:

There was a lot of scary stuff.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

And arresting. To plan for this trip. Okay, and to go see this doctor. That in itself was a scary thing.

Tim Pickett:

I'll bet.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

It was in downtown San Francisco in not the financial or restaurant district. Like I said, you had to come with $475 cash for this doctor. Right? Not really knowing what was going to happen. Then what do you do after that? Because there was no pharmacies or dispensaries really available yet per se like it is now. So I lived in Lake Tahoe and the closest place to go get medicine with San Francisco. So that was a full day drive now to go. Once I got my card, which was awesome, to go and find-

Chris Holifield:

Weren't police still getting people and busting people and causing problems?

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Yeah. So long. Still to this day they are.

Chris Holifield:

It's a long drive, to not be 100% protected really.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Yeah. Still to this day, they are. So now it's just different reasonings.

Chris Holifield:

What was your reason to get your card? Just because you wanted to get a little more protection I guess?

Amy Hollenbaugh:

I did. I wanted more protection, you know what I mean? Really my ultimate end goal was to grow it myself for myself.

Chris Holifield:

They would allow that in California or no?

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Yeah.

Chris Holifield:

Yeah, yeah.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Before they changed to recreational in some counties, like in Oakland County, you're allowed to grow 99 plants for yourself.

Chris Holifield:

Oh my gosh. Because in California, it's all county by county. Right?

Amy Hollenbaugh:

I mean if you think that's county. Yeah. It's by county, right?

Chris Holifield:

Yeah, it's all county by county.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

So you're also allowed to be a caregiver for other people?

Tim Pickett:

Oh, so you can grow a 99 for you and I could grow a 99 for Amy and a 99 for Chris.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Yeah. And a 99 for Ben and 99 for Molly.

Tim Pickett:

This is great.

Chris Holifield:

I will pay for your card evaluation.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

You bet.

Chris Holifield:

How many acres would 99 plants be? That would be even ... 99, that's a lot of area.

Tim Pickett:

That's a lot of area.

Chris Holifield:

I'm just thinking if somebody really dig-

Tim Pickett:

I mean, I don't have enough avocado trees to point 99 plants. Right, from the tops of these trees.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

No. I didn't have that many avocado trees in Hawaii.

Tim Pickett:

But you're up in Tahoe, so totally different climates. Totally different growth?

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Absolutely. So I mean, really could could you pull off a plant in Lake Tahoe? Probably not. In the summer time, you probably could. But you'd have to be very diligent about its cultivation.

Tim Pickett:

Yeah, absolutely.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Care that you're in giving it.

Tim Pickett:

You're in Tahoe, when did you come here?

Amy Hollenbaugh:

I came here two and a half years ago with this fabulous business plan that some of my other business partners from California, and they had a friend who lived over here. They wanted to start this CBD and cannabis hemp clothing, medicinal store, and just show Utah what the plant can do other than just be a medicine. Because it has so many great benefits that we haven't even touched on yet really as a world.

Tim Pickett:

Really, and even on this podcast, we haven't had a lot of conversations about hemp and the clothing and a lot of other things you can do with the plant, right?

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Yeah, for sure. There's much. Yeah, I try to keep as many hemp products in my store as possible, even though I'm also a CBD store. So there's a health supplement area and a CBD area. then the whole glassware area for those who use tobacco type things.

Chris Holifield:

Right. You still have to say it that way. Right?

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Yeah. So they tell us. Yes.

Tim Pickett:

So the store name's SLC Haze.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Yes. That's our store name.

Chris Holifield:

What's the address?

Tim Pickett:

8585 South State Street in Sandy.

Chris Holifield:

Figure it was Sandy.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Yeah.

Tim Pickett:

Walk us through your story a little bit.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Well, you walk in and it's hemp central. It's hemp headquarters. So I have anything hemp that you can get your hands on, I tried to keep in my store. So there's hemp textiles. Believe it or not, there's only a few companies making hemp textiles in our country. There's really only a few handfuls in the whole world. So we need a lot more of them because there's a lot of hemp being processed now and a lot of stems, seeds and sticks.

Tim Pickett:

Yeah. A lot of biomass.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Yeah. As Snoop sings about, we don't smoke that. So what are you going to do with it? Well, there's fuel, there's textiles, there's food. There's so many things we haven't even touched on yet. So I try to keep that stuff in and products available in the shop. So there's all kinds of socks, there's clothing, there's towels. There's hats, there's home décor, like candles, and incense.

Tim Pickett:

That's a great place for gifts.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Oh my gosh. I am super gift central.

Tim Pickett:

If you're listening to this podcast, you're likely involved at least a little bit in the cannabis community, in our community.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Yeah. For sure.

Tim Pickett:

This would be a great place for gifts. This is very timely.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Thank you.

Tim Pickett:

Think of your back to school. You've got Halloween.

Chris Holifield:

I like the way you're thinking, Tim.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

I like the way you're thinking.

Tim Pickett:

You've got Thanksgiving and chocolate giving.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Yeah. Then I also have another thing we really to follow in the store is if it's not hemp or from cannabis, then it needs to be eco-friendly or recycled and a small business. We love women-owned business. We love veteran owned businesses. We love people who have the same types of philosophies that we do about just taking care of your own health, wellness and mental being and being good to our planet, things like that. So I have a couple of other lines that have nothing to do with cannabis. They're STEM, educational. So when you said gift central, we do all kinds of education in there, there's books galore. There's a couch, you can come and sit down and read books on cannabis and wellness and health and other things that we do too, like red light therapy, sound and vibration therapy.

Tim Pickett:

I've heard red light therapy is really good for you. I don't really-

Amy Hollenbaugh:

I love it myself. That's why we have a room because my schedule, I kept having to cancel my appointments at Quintessence. So finally I'm like, "Well, I better just get myself together and take care of myself a little better than what I'm doing." So we just created one there.

Tim Pickett:

I love it.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Now we have a red light therapy room there as well. We have a couple of people on staff. We have a medical assisted, CNA, Ms. Heather, and then an aesthetician, Ms. Celeste. So anyways, they're adorable. Everything's by donation. There's no set prices. It's just by donation.

Tim Pickett:

Wait. Even that everything there to buy?

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Not on the retail store, just on the red light therapy.

Tim Pickett:

Okay. I was going to say, yes, you'd go broke.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

And the sound and vibration therapy. I wish I could. If I could, I would.

Tim Pickett:

Yeah.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

My business partner doesn't like my philosophy already. Our profit and loss statements are completely opposite from one another and what they should be, you know what I mean? Which leads me into we have a little a patient appreciation day that quite a few dispensaries and CBD stores have all come together to collaborate and say thank you so much to the patients of Utah and their family and friends.

Chris Holifield:

Yeah, let's talk about this.

Tim Pickett:

Yeah, let's talk about this because of this. I've got this flyer in front of me. It looks to me it's going to be a sweet setup at Lagoon. August 15th?

Amy Hollenbaugh:

We're trying really hard to make it as sweet as possible. That is true. Yes, it's that Lagoon. It's the first annual Celebrate Cannabis Patients of Utah. It is multiple dispensaries and multiple CBD stores. That also includes some of the farms and processors. There are so many that are involved. That put together patient appreciation day, we got together with Lagoon. They have offered us these two fabulous pavilions. So we have performances that afternoon from this lovely musician called Coco. Her name is Coco. She writes her own music, and she plays the ukulele. She's fabulous. So hopefully, she's singing some of her original songs that day.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Then this other local hip hop group, whom I love and adore, the 420V Boys. They're going to be performing that day too. Then there's all kinds of raffles, games and different discounts going on at the pavilion that the different dispensaries and CBD stores have all come together to contribute. So we also ended up getting the biggest discount you can get. We got $20 off for everybody. So now it's $55.

Tim Pickett:

For the admission to Lagoon?

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Yeah.

Chris Holifield:

Wow.

Tim Pickett:

So 20 bucks-

Chris Holifield:

It's been a while since I've been to Lagoon. I didn't realize ticket prices were $75 more.

Tim Pickett:

I know.

Chris Holifield:

To get in. I mean, this is a great deal. If you're going to go at least go this day.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Yeah, you are. Definitely if you're not a Cannabis patient and you just want to go anyways, then come on down. We're a great group of people and we love everybody. We appreciate everybody. So come on down and just get a ticket anyways. Take your family out. Have a discounted day.

Tim Pickett:

Yeah, so it looks you've got to you've got to buy tickets at one of these sponsors. So I'm going to read them off.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

You do. Okay.

Tim Pickett:

You got OG Cannabis Products in Millcreek, SLC Haze, yours, Zen Mart, Terra Health and Wellness in Millcreek. Some of the sponsors include True North, Curaleaf, Truce, Utah Vape Guy, Carter's Kids Farm. I mean, this is a pretty good well rounded event.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

It is.

Tim Pickett:

The fact that you've got Mariojuana.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Oh.

Tim Pickett:

Right? Mario up there being the emcee.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

I know.

Tim Pickett:

Right?

Chris Holifield:

He's a good guy.

Tim Pickett:

He's a good guy.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

He's so fun, and he's great. everyone loves him. So why not have him be the emcee? Plus, he's the first patient so let him do it.

Chris Holifield:

So yeah, and it's good for all day. I mean, 10:00 AM to 10:00 PM.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

It is. It's good for the entire day. So even if you don't want to participate in the appreciation area or you don't want to learn about cannabis, or you already know about it, then you don't have to hang out there. You can just roll down the river if you want.

Tim Pickett:

Yeah. Come and get your tickets, show your patient card and save yourself 20 bucks.

Chris Holifield:

That's right.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Yeah. I've even extended my hours at my store for the next three weeks so that I don't miss anyone wanting tickets.

Tim Pickett:

Well, what are your hours at your store?

Amy Hollenbaugh:

10:00 AM to 8:00 PM except for today.

Tim Pickett:

Did you make you set down early?

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Well, Jessica wasn't available. She's camping.

Tim Pickett:

I'm feel so bad.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Gosh. There's no reason to be sorry. We all need to be celebratory of getting out and about. I'm really excited to come out actually after the past 18 months.

Tim Pickett:

Right. How did your store fare through COVID? Because you've had it for two and a half years now?

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Yeah, so we have actually been open. We're just about ready to have our two year anniversary. It hasn't been easy. That is for sure. We have had to add many different things that we never thought of, like health supplements. I didn't think that a CBD and hemp store would need that. But lo and behold, we definitely did. All of the clients who come in and really seem to appreciate it. They've learned a lot about immune building because I'm really big on that with my own health. So there are so many products that I found that seemed to be shortage during the beginning of COVID time. So I just looked into some really great small brands. What do you know? I brought them into the store. So we have some really great things in there that aren't related to cannabis, like elderberry, colloidal silver.

Tim Pickett:

Cool.

Chris Holifield:

That's good stuff.

Tim Pickett:

I think people appreciate the fact that you're not just duped. People come in and they're like, "Oh, I really appreciate you're not just selling CBD."

Chris Holifield:

They really do. Yeah.

Tim Pickett:

Right? I can get little bit more.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

We originally designed the store so that it could be very family friendly from visual standpoint as well as educational standpoint, which are both really important. One, I didn't want it to look scary to a family, to a grandma bringing in their grandchild who's out for the day doing something or a family who's out on Saturday running an errand. I wanted the whole family to be able to come into the store and look at all the different things that we can do with this plant other than just get high, which is also CBD and medicinal. Not that there's anything wrong with getting high, if that's what you want to do, then have a party. Yeah. Go for it.

Tim Pickett:

But there is more to it.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Yeah, it does have its little stigma that comes along with just that highness, of just using the plant to get high and it being recreational. Right? So it was really important for us to lay a foundation on being a good role model and a good educator on everything the plant can do and for business ideas. I mean, we need a lot more textile companies. So if you don't want to grow the plant for medicine, you can broker all your plant matter off to a textile company.

Tim Pickett:

Yeah, I've even looked for paper. I remember when I started my UtahMarijuana.org and the clinic. I thought, "Oh, you know what I need is I need my business cards printed on hemp paper."

Chris Holifield:

How cool would that be?

Tim Pickett:

That just makes sense.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Doesn't it?

Tim Pickett:

It was so hard to find.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

It's the hardest.

Tim Pickett:

I mean, I ended up, sorry, I can't find it.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

No. It's hardest thing. One project that I'm actually working on right now, I'm super excited about it, that I'm working on with hemp zoo, which is this small, awesome hemp textile company down in San Diego, California. They have made this fabulous hemp cover all. Right? So hemp is breathable, it's antibacterial, it lasts longer than cotton. So I'm trying to get the farms, especially here in Utah, to have all the cultivators start wearing hemp as well as the socks, the hats and their coveralls instead of just wearing this uncomfortable polyester from a scrubs giant corporate company that comes in. One of the-

Tim Pickett:

You've been to the growth facilities and they're all in scrubs, huh?

Amy Hollenbaugh:

I've been to some of them. Yeah.

Tim Pickett:

They are.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

I have been to some of them. Some of are in lab coats and some are in scrubs. I mean, it's the easiest, really. Because I would hope there wouldn't be bugs. If there were, I hope they would only be ladybugs, but they show up. You could see really easy on on scrubs without different pockets and all, seams and things like that. So we have these coveralls that the farms haven't really caught on to yet.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

So we're going to need to work on that. Because I think it would be really great. One of the reasons that I came to Utah was because it was really fun to look at the regulations that they put on CBD. Okay? One of the few states that really heavily regulated CBD right. So I found that very interesting because, well, I mean, you're only going to have serious businesses, right? Because they have to follow all these guidelines. They have to go through all these different processes which is money backing to have their either farm or store or medicine be regulated here. So I thought that was really interesting.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

I really liked that they wanted CBD regulated as well as THC because I think that's really important. Because well, all of it is important to know where your medicine came from. Yeah. What their cultivation practices are, who they are as a business. That leads me full circle back to the hemp coveralls and how hard it is to find hemp paper. One of the other projects I've been working on is being a CBD retailer. All this CBD comes in, right? I have to put it on the shelf. It comes in in plastic and it comes in in a box. Then it comes in vacuum sealed in plastic. Holy cow. It's driving me bonkers because we should be using hemp recycled paper goods for packaging all this hemp medicine our glassware or something like that and no plastic whatsoever.

Tim Pickett:

Yeah. It seems a little silly. Right?

Amy Hollenbaugh:

It does.

Chris Holifield:

A little contradictory almost.

Tim Pickett:

Yeah.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

A little bit. Here we are in the hemp and cannabis industry, right, that this plant could save our planet. Let's be real. Then we're packaging it up in ...

Tim Pickett:

We're doing all the normal things to get it to you.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

All the normal quick, quick things. Yeah. So there is a packaging company as well. They're just trying to get things rolling. Holy cow. Breaking the habit is as difficult as it gets.

Chris Holifield:

Wow. I didn't even think about all that. I wonder if gosh, one day one day it'll become more than normal.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

I think so.

Chris Holifield:

More and more people will-

Amy Hollenbaugh:

I think so because the education is just really getting rolling. The snowball is so small, we could barely throw it. So it needs to snow. Then we need to make our snowball bigger to get this ball rolling. So that when we say we're from the cannabis industry and we produce medicine, that it's also the cultivation practices from what they're wearing to the soils that they're using. How glorious would it be if everyone was using biodynamic soil and a soil was alive and well and feeding your plants because there's good bugs in there doing all that, mulching the soil and getting all that ready. Right? Giving us everything so that we don't have to feed additional nutrients.

Tim Pickett:

Then all the way from the packaging to the distribution.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

All of it, from all of it.

Tim Pickett:

And everything.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Be a real support system for making it full circle how the plant can really be much more than just something to get high off of or pain relieving or anxiety relieving. Yeah, we're missing the boat. The big, big boat.

Chris Holifield:

Hopefully we get on that boat pretty soon.

Tim Pickett:

I think we've got a ways. I'm a little ... Gosh.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

If there's anybody out there that wants to help us build this boat and get a bigger snowball, please come help us. Yeah. Because it is a struggle.

Tim Pickett:

I know the Global Hemp Association that's around in Utah. Right? They were doing these socials, and they were involving other people in the industry. This was before COVID. Now they're really trying but it does seem you're in an uphill battle.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

It's uphill. Yeah. I can't imagine how much our industry has actually declined with advancement over the past 18 months due to COVID. Right? Because well, everyone's habits are different. Some businesses didn't make it and have shut down. I know a lot of people that are struggling and mentally too. Just all of this has been such a change for everybody. So to open the box again and get excited about really birthing this plant instead of just opening a dispensary, which is totally needed. Because otherwise, I'm out on the street looking for my medicine.

Tim Pickett:

Right? Or you're having to drive five hours. Right?

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Yeah. Exactly.

Tim Pickett:

To San Francisco all the way back. We definitely-

Chris Holifield:

That's a lot further than five hours from San Francisco to Utah.

Tim Pickett:

Well, from Utah for sure.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Well, depends on your time machine.

Chris Holifield:

Yeah. Or how fast you drive. That's right, Amy.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Well, now, I'm a fast driver. So I could get there quickly. There's a few police officers around that would confirm I could get there quickly.

Chris Holifield:

What are your thoughts on the on the Utah medical cannabis, becoming legal here and all of that? I mean, were you part of any of that?

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Well, that all actually got voted on before I arrived.

Chris Holifield:

That's true, that's true. Yeah.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

It was one of the things that encouraged me to come here, which was before the whole COVID thing, I'm so glad for. California and Nevada too which are the two main states that I've operated my cannabis businesses out of for the past 12 years, they have taken such a different direction when recreational came onto play. There's a ton of people who can offer what recreational has to offer, which is great. We need more people out educating and trying to build on these other areas that are just lacking right now.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

I love the plant so much that I just try and devote as much time, energy and effort that I can into it. Before it went recreational, I was privileged enough to be part of a roundtable group that we were hired from the state of California to help them develop the medical industry rolling into the recreational industry. It was really important for them to try and salvage the farmers and the original people that formed the cannabis community, which was mainly on the West Coast, about probably 30 some years ago. Right? People like Jack Herrera and people Dennis Perone and Brownie Mary, and just with Soma, without people that really paving the way for all of us and doing what they did with their freedoms on the line, then none of us would be here today. We would still be probably out searching the street for a joint or something. Right? Not the safest thing to do.

Tim Pickett:

So do you like the medical program? It sounds your business does better with a medical program in general separating the recreational or the adult use from that?

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Well, yeah. Once the farm bill passed, there was a real explosion of, I'm looking for some word. Some imitation. I'll call it imitation, especially CBD products. Coming in from other countries, not being tested, no basis of what was in it, no quality control. with me having a family member who had MS, obtaining CBD even in California, was the hardest thing I have ever had to do in the cannabis world. Five years ago, finding CBD for him, that was quality. That wasn't tainted in any way with pesticides, with chemical residuals, with alcohol residuals. Oh my goodness. For it to have consistency, for him to respond, this is a really advanced sick young man.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

So the consistency of the medicine and the cannabis that he was getting was of utmost importance. We saw a huge difference with our own research and our own logging of different applications and different products that we would get for him. It could be anything from driving to Colorado to flying to Washington to finding growers in California. There's there especially back then, before this farm bill got passed, there wasn't a whole lot of really money and profit, right, in the CBD industry. So to find that was the hardest thing possible. When he went without it, it was huge declines in his health,

Amy Hollenbaugh:

He's already in a wheelchair and needing care and nursing 24/7. So when you're already in that situation, and you see huge declines, you're doing everything in your power to make sure that the good medicines, that you're finding that what can you do to help them, keep producing good medicine. When you find a medicine that is not of quality, I mean, I feel it's my obligation at this point as a patient and as a caretaker, and a caregiver to try and educate our patients and our own selves out there about taking it into your own hand. If you're not responding well to an application that you're using of a cannabis product, why? There'll be an answer as to why. There'll be an answer as to what reactions you're having and why you're having that too. They almost all lead back to the same thing, and that's dirty medicine.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

So having clean, tested, regulated medicine, which is probably going to be from a smaller farmer, because to have control of it in the growing environment, right, is harder and more challenging the bigger it gets. Then also, I mean, the cannabis industry, holy cow, the strange, change, just like the weather and so does everything else. We're just changing day by day, hour by hour almost with products, with development, with different compounds that we're finally researching enough to find out. Oh, CBG is great for sleep. Right? Or certain strains are great to grow for anxiety and bottle, spray for anxiety. So finding all that out and moving forward with that is what I really wanted to continue to be a part of.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Before I got into the cannabis industry, I was in the pharmaceutical industry. Didn't really care for how that was operating. So the whole plant medicine, and that's also what really took my health into a real positive direction was introducing plant medicine, learning how to use it, learning what terpenes my body favored, and what applications my body favored was a big part of why I feel better and operate daily on a more positive note.

Tim Pickett:

What are some of the products and terpenes that you really favor?

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Oh gosh. Well, I love Linalool. That's absolutely my ultimate favorite. Because, well, one, it's calming so that the lavender smell that you're familiar with if you're wondering what linalool smells. It's the nice calming lavender smell and has calming effects. I love it well because it has that effect. But I also won my first Cannabis Cup in California growing lavender. So that's the other reason I love it. Soma's lavender, one of the old Rastafarians, his old strain. So it's really beneficial for pain relief, for sleeping, for inflammation. It's huge for an appetite stimulant. So if you need help with the appetite, then linalool is a great usually terpene for you.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Another awesome terpene is myrcene which I love myrcene at nighttime because I have too much to do during the day. So that's your tropically mango-ish smelling terpene. What are some other favorites that I have? Well, I'm really a favorite when I use cannabis, THC cannabis, I'm a big favor of sativas because I have a lot going on all day long. So as much as I'd really to just smoke Wiz Khalifa Kush all day long, I'm not going to get anything done.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

So I love lemon terpenes, limonene and pinene. Those are awesome terpenes for myself. It's to each person's own liking and what every person has a little bit more different reaction than some people. Some people can't take limonene at all or pinene because it gives them anxiety. So you can also get some bad side effects from all the terpenes as well as not good. If you use citrus at nighttime, you might not sleep. So anyway.

Tim Pickett:

So if you need to pull an all-nighter, there's a good one for you.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

There is.

Chris Holifield:

The little sativa, little limonene.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Definitely. I love lime all day long.

Tim Pickett:

What would you tell somebody? I know I asked this almost on every episode. I'm going to ask you though, Amy, is people that are listening, that maybe are on the fence of trying cannabis as a way to help them with something, some medicinal reasons. What would what advice or suggestions would you tell them?

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Well, I'm only going to go with suggestions because I'm not a doctor.

Tim Pickett:

Sure, sure, sure.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

We're not on TV because I do play one on TV. But no, seriously, it's only going to be suggestions. I have had bad experiences, not myself. But I have had other people did not use slow, shall we say. So they hallucinated the heck out of themselves for about eight or more hours. If that's not what you're looking for, I would say definitely start slow. Starting slow. it could be a THC gummy or a nibble of one. Or it could be a CBD product, anything from a topical to a gum to a vape cartridge. I mean, there's so many products on the market.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

They have so many options now for us, it's almost confusing. Do you want to be discreet with your use or do you want everyone to see your vape pen? So it's going to be your own personal, how you feel about it. I don't care what anybody thinks about my vape pen or my stick of CBD gum. If somebody else cares, then you can be discreet if you want to be. Then also, I mean, if you're not using a lot of prescription medications, I would say you're probably going to have a lower tolerance. So keep that in mind when you go get a product. You might not want to vape product because that's going to hit you really quick and really hard.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

So if you're not already have a tolerance to any kind of pain relief medications, and I would say that would be prescription ones from your doctor, or you're not already using substances, then your tolerance is probably going to be low. Keep that in mind. So I've had a couple little adorable old ladies come in to my store for educational purposes. So they came in. They went through the whole process of getting their card and they were so excited. They went down to one of our dispensaries that has the THC products. I don't know what was said, so I can only go with what the little old lady was telling me. But she ate an entire gummy. Then she decided to eat another one an hour later.

Tim Pickett:

Look out. Watch this.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Now she has been religiously going to church every Sunday for 70 something years. She has never smoked a tobacco cigarette or a clove cigarette or any other type of cigarette for that matter.

Chris Holifield:

So never had her mind altered by anything.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

No mind altering on anything, I don't think. Then also has never drank drank alcohol. I'm asking her all this when she's in my store. It's always ...

Tim Pickett:

Wait, did she have the gummy in your store now?

Amy Hollenbaugh:

No. Goodness no.

Tim Pickett:

I was going to say.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Because I don't have those there.

Tim Pickett:

No. I didn't know if maybe she ate them before or she didn't or something.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Yeah. I know. We don't have open houses with those kind of gummies. But we do with gum. So it's not THC gum. Yeah. So she really had quite a journey. Okay? It lasted her about six hours, she said. She didn't know it was going to do that. So there's an example of especially in Utah with the elderly people, and then just the church in general and so many people practicing those.

Chris Holifield:

Yeah, ways of life. Right?

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Yeah, they are. They're ways. Yeah. So I would say if any of those people are out here listening, start low and go slow, which we recommend anyways. But some people like to just dive off the deep end.

Chris Holifield:

I think that's a common recommendation, I think you say that even a lot too, Tim, to start.

Tim Pickett:

Yeah. We say that all that time. It really is a matter of every patient needs that personal, like a guide. Here, here. Let me help you find just the right dose. Right?

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Oh, it's so hard too to recommend a dose of any type to really anybody because everyone's going to react differently to a terpene, to a delivery method. Then they have their own ...

Chris Holifield:

Well, then they have their own free will about what they're going to listen and they hear. They might hear different things than you are thinking you're saying.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Absolutely.

Chris Holifield:

They go home and take a gummy and then they take another one an hour later.

Tim Pickett:

Yeah.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

I mean even in Utah with our strict regulations, the gummies look as delicious as can be. I would seriously eat a whole bag, don't anybody go off and do that. I mean, I've eaten three bags before. Yeah, yep, and yep. I don't recommend that to anybody. Anyways, but I would do it again.

Chris Holifield:

Well, sometimes we forge. If you think about the first time you ever used smoked a joint or smoked out of a bong, that one hit and you are gone, right?

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Right.

Chris Holifield:

I mean at least it was for me, if you go back quite a few years.

Tim Pickett:

Yeah, you're sitting there talking to yourself.

Chris Holifield:

Now that we've built up a little bit of a tolerance, sometimes we forget that people have to start real small.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Real small.

Tim Pickett:

Real low. Yeah. Or we even know how to, if you do smoke too much or eat too much, we know how to handle it. Just chill out. Just relax, ride it out.

Chris Holifield:

Do these things, change your schedule.

Tim Pickett:

Yeah.

Chris Holifield:

Right?

Tim Pickett:

Yeah.

Chris Holifield:

You can be honest about it too. I find that for me, being honest about it around other people gives people more freedom, right? If you use a little too much, being able to say to your partner or your spouse, your girlfriend, boyfriend, whoever is there, "Oh wow. I'm a little bit high right now or I'm a little stoned right now." We can't do that.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Yeah.

Chris Holifield:

I'm not going to be as reliable right now. Right? That's okay. But that takes a while too. That's even the next step from being using to being open about you use to somebody else.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

To being open. Yeah, definitely. Yeah. Well, talking about terpenes again, there's even terpenes that are really good if you took too much THC. So the pepper terpene is really good for counteracting that.

Chris Holifield:

I've heard for being a little bit of THC, psychoactivity and the paranoia.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Mm-hmm (affirmative). You could have black pepper around you, you could have a hot pepper around you. Suck on that.

Tim Pickett:

Wow. That I didn't have to find that.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Shoot. You might have to call the fire department regarding your tongue and your mouth.

Chris Holifield:

Just drink a lot of waters, maybe the water that's making you ...

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Lemon also. So we had this one guy in California, we used to go to these farmers markets as vendors. Okay? Before the law changed, when you were a medical card holder, we had farmers markets throughout the whole entire state. They were cannabis farmers markets, and the farmers could go there. Well, we called it exchange, exchange and donate each other's products back and forth.

Tim Pickett:

This was in California?

Amy Hollenbaugh:

This is in California.

Tim Pickett:

They don't do this anymore, though?

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Nope. You're not allowed to do that now because of the recreational law that came into play.

Tim Pickett:

Right. There's actually less access for patients really in need in California. Right? Because the recreational law.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Yeah, yeah. It really hurt access to and pricing to the medical community in California for sure and the other Pacific states that did that as well too. Yeah, it did. But the bigger picture is the bigger picture. That's to generate taxable real commodities-

Tim Pickett:

Revenue.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

And revenue. So anyways, they're doing a dang good job at that. So we have to give them that. But yeah, access became really hard for patients, right? So we had these farmers markets. Not just the patients too, but because if you lived in a county that had a high Grow Your Own number, then you were allowed to do something with your excess product. So these farmers markets formed, okay? So they're really great. It's a how a lot of the companies that ended up going big, that are still around today that built their brand, how they built their brand, is they started at the farmers market. Then found a packer and were able to go legal and go through all those channels and have a giant big warehouse now, 45,000 square feet and have it all pre going to cookies if you're good enough. So now that's the industry in California. I'm not part of that industry.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

So like I the small farmer, small medicine, patient appreciation type of where you can really ... I like one on ones. I have one on one people all day long that come in, asking questions. Some have come from a dispensary and they're like, "Oh, so and so told me to come and ask you the question." I'm like, "Oh, but she's a pharmacist."

Chris Holifield:

Sounds like you should get a job as a pharmacist.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Well, I mean, no. That's where we're all really collaborating with one another is so the pharmacists definitely understand all the chemical compounds and all those terpene compounds. They understand all that. then we have a cultivator that's had their medical card since 1997. Right? I've been growing my own strain since then and gotten rid of some and obtained some strictly because of how it affects you and the side effects or the flavors. Everything gets so trendy and changes so much that you have to change with the times. If you can't do that, you'll just get smothered and stomped on.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

But being able to do that is excellent research for all of us since we weren't legally allowed to be researching and developing right over the past 30 or 50 years since we got shut down in the 30s. Right? So there is so much work to catch up on. So now, you have the pharmacist that is the professionally school educated, right, in the chemistry and pharmacology. Then you have your street educated person like myself, who has had to learn what strains helped me, what strains were causing my anxiety, what was keeping me up at night.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

That was all my own individual research. I took that responsibility on myself, trying to figure out why my health wasn't improving or why it would decline when I use this product or didn't have that. So now, I think it's actually really great that we do have a doctor, pharmacist on staff there. We can claim that. As we all continue to work more together, they will learn more of the cannabis research and terminology. We will all learn medical terminology and pharmacology and understand that better. So two worlds collide.

Tim Pickett:

Yeah. There will be much more integration of both those worlds, as we go forward, right? Which is going to be great.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Yes. Something that I really look forward to is integrating those departments together. Yeah, they've been completely divided for decades. I'll have to say, I disagree with that completely. Because I use both in my own health. There's a time and a place where you absolutely need a prescription. For example, I threw my back out. There was no getting away from the pain I was in, I have some of the best products around and nothing I had was even touching it. So I just had to. That's when I was so thankful for the ER doctor and the prescription of muscle relaxers and a little bit of pain relief for a few days, to get me past all the spasming that I was going through. But I don't want to use it every day.

Tim Pickett:

Yeah. Right.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

So I'm definitely a fan when I need it. I love definitely making sure I get all my vitamins and my minerals. I can't do that through cannabis. So I have my awesome nutritional doctor that makes sure I get my vitamin shots. So the two worlds together I think can do great things. That's where the medical industry, like it's time they're ready. Doctors and veterinarians, friends of mine, a lot of them are going back to school and re-educating and taking only nutritional classes or only plant medicine classes or herbalist classes so that they can have more education and be talking to a bigger patient group on different types of alternative choices that we do have, and really just using pharmaceuticals for emergency type or really disease typed ailments.

Chris Holifield:

Applications, right?

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Yep. Everyone would feel better. Yeah. You'd feel a lot better.

Chris Holifield:

Such an interesting story, Tim.

Tim Pickett:

Absolutely. We've covered a lot of different things. But it's been a great conversation.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Yeah. It's been super fun.

Tim Pickett:

I'm excited about your-

Amy Hollenbaugh:

I brought you guys a gift from my store.

Tim Pickett:

You did?

Chris Holifield:

Yeah.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Yeah, I did. So here's some examples of things that are in my store.

Tim Pickett:

Look at this.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

And all kinds of things for you guys.

Tim Pickett:

So let's talk about some of them while we're still recording.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Yeah. Textile. So we have hemp towels.

Chris Holifield:

So Anact hand towel. It's hemp and cotton.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Yeah.

Tim Pickett:

Really fulls.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Hemp and organic cotton. So you can have hemp towels in your bathroom or kitchen. I have hemp reuseable coffee and tea filters.

Chris Holifield:

Look at that.

Tim Pickett:

What?

Amy Hollenbaugh:

I know. Who knew? No, it doesn't get you high.

Chris Holifield:

You pour over the coffee. This is like an edible filter?

Amy Hollenbaugh:

I know, it sounds like a good idea. But it is not edible, but it is reusable.

Tim Pickett:

This is so cool.

Chris Holifield:

Okay. So that's really cool.

Tim Pickett:

For people listening, it's like this cloth hemp thing.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Yeah, it is.

Chris Holifield:

It looks a hemp mask. You just put it in your coffeemaker and this will-

Tim Pickett:

This will actually save you some money to.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Yeah. You're reusing instead of throwing out coffee filters and it's hemp. I mean, especially now that there are so many growers and so much hemp and cannabis being produced nation and worldwide. We have all this excess stems, seeds again, and leaves that Snoop Dogg right doesn't recommend we smoke. Right? So we have to do something with it. so anyways, there's all these different products.

Tim Pickett:

So I've got some CBD gum here.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

That's one of my favorite products around right now.

Tim Pickett:

Broad spectrum, frosted mint, 200 milligrams, CBD.

Chris Holifield:

These are all products you can get in your store right now. Right?

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Yeah.

Tim Pickett:

Yeah, this is really cool. I've never tried any gum. I mean, this is a good concept.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Oh well, that's a local company and they're registered.

Chris Holifield:

A local. Let's just give them.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Yeah, of course. It's called vibe gum. Everyone that I've had using it really loves it for anxiety and panic and a quick calm. So there you go. If you want to try some gum, and it's all really good ingredients so there's nothing bad in there. We have a couple dentist's office that even have it now. Then the other item is a hemp candle. This is one of my other ... Well, I won five-

Chris Holifield:

Jamaican Me Crazy.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Yeah. Jamaican Me Crazy fat, that's one of my favorite scents. It's very tropically and calming.

Tim Pickett:

Yeah. This is really cool.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Yep, that is a high times Cannabis Cup award winning product. Let's see. I won two high times cups in Sacramento with that product, that scent. Then I also want to with the candle, with the different scent. Then we won in Michigan for best CBD massage candle.

Tim Pickett:

Oh really?

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Yeah. So there's all hemp wicks, so they're non toxic.

Tim Pickett:

Hand-poured, THC-free, hemp wicks.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Yep.

Tim Pickett:

Yeah, these candles are going to ... I mean, this is great.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Then the other thing I brought was this doesn't have any CBD, hemp or THC in it. But it's one of my favorite tea brands, period. I'm a huge tea drinker. That's why I brought you the filter as well so you can try it. It's a local brand too. The Queen's Tea.

Tim Pickett:

I met these people at the farmers market, at the downtown farmers market.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Yeah, you can also get it at SLC Haze.

Tim Pickett:

Yeah, well, yeah, yeah, yeah. I don't know. This was a few farmers markets ago. The downtown farmers market.

Chris Holifield:

The Queen's Tea.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

The Queen's Tea.

Tim Pickett:

Actually I need to interview them on on my other podcast.

Chris Holifield:

Yeah. I am Salt Lake.

Tim Pickett:

On I am Salt Lake.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

So I love the Queen's Tea. They're one of my favorite brands. They blend everything themselves and hand select all the ingredients, which is what we like to do.

Tim Pickett:

I like that scents.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

At SLC Haze, hand select everything there.

Chris Holifield:

Again, great for gifts. What's the address again, Amy?

Amy Hollenbaugh:

8585 South State Street in Sandy.

Tim Pickett:

You're on Facebook to I'm looking at ... Actually I'm on your Facebook page which is tons of cool information and photos. Is this little French Bulldog, is that a little Frenchie?

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Yes.

Tim Pickett:

Is that your little doggy?

Amy Hollenbaugh:

That's Winston Haze.

Tim Pickett:

I've always wanted a little Frenchie.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Well, he is pretty mad that he didn't get to come.

Tim Pickett:

We should've brought him.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

So anyways, he is the rock star of the whole thing.

Tim Pickett:

Yeah. I want to come just to come hang out with the dog.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

You should because there's people that come and hang out with him on a daily and weekly basis.

Tim Pickett:

Well, that's pretty cool.

Chris Holifield:

Yeah.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

He is. He's the coolest guy ever. He'll definitely give you lots of love when you come. So count on that. Count on that.

Tim Pickett:

Then again, the Lagoon thing is happening on August 15th, which is a Sunday.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

It is.

Tim Pickett:

Which is the perfect way to spend your Sunday in my opinion, right?

Amy Hollenbaugh:

We put a lot of thought into that. So everyone come.

Chris Holifield:

The Church of Lagoon for $55, $20 off. Take you and your family up there.

Tim Pickett:

But come into SLC Haze and buy your ticket there.

Chris Holifield:

Yeah, that's right.

Tim Pickett:

Support Amy.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Thank you.

Tim Pickett:

Let's keep her in business, you guys. This has been really great.

Chris Holifield:

I think she's great for the community. I mean, I think I do.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

I do. Yeah, there's-

Tim Pickett:

I mean, we definitely need this resource for the community.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Yeah. Keep your immune system built too, okay? Even if you don't want to use cannabis or hemp products, we have really great immune and health products in there. I have a couple pine resin products that have kept a couple little old ladies healthy for a year and a half.

Tim Pickett:

That must just make you feel so good.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

It does. Yeah.

Tim Pickett:

That you're helping these people out.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Yeah. Puts a big smile on my face all day long.

Tim Pickett:

That is so awesome.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

It's why I do it. Yep. Because to share how I got healthy and then to see other people is just winning. You got to love it. That's why we're here. Love and share.

Tim Pickett:

Anything else you want to-

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Trying to do my part.

Tim Pickett:

Anything else you want to mention, Amy, before we wrap this out?

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Come out to Lagoon Day.

Tim Pickett:

Yeah. Come out to lagoon day.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

After that come to SLC Haze.

Chris Holifield:

Absolutely.

Tim Pickett:

Well, come to SLC Haze before Lagoon Day.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Before.

Chris Holifield:

Before. You got to get your tickets.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

During and after.

Chris Holifield:

Because you can't get your tickets on the day of, after date. You have to get them before.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

You do. You need to get them before August 14th. So plan ahead.

Chris Holifield:

Very cool.

Tim Pickett:

Absolutely.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Come on in. Great joining you guys. Thanks for having me.

Tim Pickett:

Yeah. Thanks for coming out.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

You guys are a lot of fun.

Chris Holifield:

Thank you so much. We appreciate it. Anything you want to add here before we wrap this up, Tim?

Tim Pickett:

The only thing I want to add is stay safe out there.

Amy Hollenbaugh:

Yep, everybody.

Chris Holifield:

All right, guys. Have a great night.

By UtahMarijuana.org
Published August 3, 2021
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